astronomer


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as·tron·o·mer

 (ə-strŏn′ə-mər)
n.
One who specializes in astronomy.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

astronomer

(əˈstrɒnəmə)
n
1. (Astronomy) a scientist who studies astronomy
2. (Professions) a scientist who studies astronomy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

as•tron•o•mer

(əˈstrɒn ə mər)

n.
an expert in astronomy; a scientific observer of the celestial bodies.
[1325–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.astronomer - a physicist who studies astronomyastronomer - a physicist who studies astronomy  
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
astrophysicist - an astronomer who studies the physical properties of celestial bodies
cosmologist - an astronomer who studies the evolution and space-time relations of the universe
physicist - a scientist trained in physics
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
عالِم فَلَك
astronom
astronom
astronomi
astronomzvjezdarzvjezdoznanac
csillagász
stjörnufræîingur
astronom
astronóm
astronom
astronomgökbilimci

astronomer

[əsˈtrɒnəməʳ] Nastrónomo/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

astronomer

[əˈstrɒnəmər] nastronome mf
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

astronomer

nAstronom(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

astronomer

[əsˈtrɒnəməʳ] nastronomo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

astronomy

(əˈstronəmi) noun
the study of the stars and their movements. He is studying astronomy.
aˈstronomer noun
astronomic(al) (ӕstrəˈnomik(l)) adjective
1. (of numbers or amounts) very large. The cost of the new building was astronomical.
2. of astronomy. astronomical observations.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
It happened that a distinguished astronomer selected a beautiful seat, that was placed on the very margin of our position, as a favorite spot for his observations and discourses; from a recollection of the latter of which, in particular, I still derive indescribable satisfaction.
At the centre of the island there is a chasm about fifty yards in diameter, whence the astronomers descend into a large dome, which is therefore called FLANDONA GAGNOLE, or the astronomer's cave, situated at the depth of a hundred yards beneath the upper surface of the adamant.
After him Hevelius, an astronomer of Dantzic, reduced the highest elevations to 15,000 feet; but the calculations of Riccioli brought them up again to 21,000 feet.
AN ASTRONOMER used to go out at night to observe the stars.
"Generous man!" cried the Astronomer, glowing with warm and elevated sentiments, "pay me, then, what you will."
And will not a true astronomer have the same feeling when he looks at the movements of the stars?
"I didn't know you were an astronomer, Miss Leeson."
Going to the edge of the pit, I found it occupied by a group of about half a dozen men--Henderson, Ogilvy, and a tall, fair-haired man that I afterwards learned was Stent, the Astronomer Royal, with several workmen wielding spades and pickaxes.
It was by noticing disturbances that a French astronomer, M.
Greatest mathematical distance of all was that between Captain Duncan's mind and the mind of an astronomer who charted the heavens and navigated a thousand million miles away among the stars and who tossed, a mere morsel of his mathematical knowledge, the few shreds of information to Captain Duncan that enabled him to know from day to day the place of the Makambo on the sea.
He felt much as an astronomer feels who has discovered a new planet -- no doubt, as far as strong, deep, unalloyed pleasure is concerned, the advantage was with the boy, not the astronomer.
"And could the astronomers have understood and calculated anything, if they had taken into account all the complicated and varied motions of the earth?