mode

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mode

method, manner; a way: a new mode of travel
Not to be confused with:
mowed – past tense of mow: He mowed the lawn.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

mode

 (mōd)
n.
1.
a. A manner, way, or method of doing something, experiencing something, or acting: modern modes of travel; modes of consciousness; modes of affection. See Synonyms at method.
b. A particular form or kind: The building has multiple modes of egress.
c. A given condition of functioning; a status or operation: The spacecraft was in its recovery mode.
2. The current or customary fashion or style: a hat in the latest mode.
3. Music
a. Any of certain fixed arrangements of the diatonic tones of an octave, as the major and minor scales of Western music.
b. A patterned arrangement, as the one characteristic of the music of classical Greece or the medieval Christian Church.
4. Philosophy The particular appearance, form, or manner in which an underlying substance, or a permanent aspect or attribute of it, is manifested.
5. Logic
a. See modality.
b. The arrangement or order of the propositions in a syllogism according to both quality and quantity.
6. Statistics The value or item occurring most frequently in a series of observations or statistical data.
7. Mathematics The number or range of numbers in a set that occurs the most frequently.
8. Geology The mineral composition of an igneous rock expressed in terms of percentage of the total sample weight or volume.
9. Physics Any of numerous patterns of wave motion or vibration.
10. Grammar Mood.

[Middle English, tune, from Latin modus, manner, tune. Sense 2, French, from Old French, fashion, manner, from Latin modus; see med- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mode

(məʊd)
n
1. a manner or way of doing, acting, or existing
2. (Clothing & Fashion) the current fashion or style
3. (Music, other) music
a. any of the various scales of notes within one octave, esp any of the twelve natural diatonic scales taken in ascending order used in plainsong, folk song, and art music until 1600
b. (in the music of classical Greece) any of the descending diatonic scales from which the liturgical modes evolved
c. either of the two main scale systems in music since 1600: major mode; minor mode.
4. (Logic) logic linguistics another name for modality3, mood22
5. (Linguistics) logic linguistics another name for modality3, mood22
6. (Philosophy) philosophy a complex combination of ideas the realization of which is not determined by the component ideas
7. (Statistics) that one of a range of values that has the highest frequency as determined statistically. Compare mean34, median6
8. (Geological Science) the quantitative mineral composition of an igneous rock
9. (General Physics) physics one of the possible configurations of a travelling or stationary wave
10. (General Physics) physics one of the fundamental vibrations
[C14: from Latin modus measure, manner]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mode1

(moʊd)

n.
1. a manner of acting or doing; method; way: modes of transportation.
2. a particular type or form of something: Heat is a mode of motion.
3. a designated condition or status, as for performing a task or responding to a problem: a machine in the automatic mode.
4. Philos. appearance, form, or disposition taken by a thing, or by one of its essential properties or attributes.
5.
b. any of the forms of categorical syllogisms according to the quantity and quality of their constituent propositions.
6. any of various arrangements of the diatonic tones of an octave, differing from one another in the order of the whole steps and half steps; scale.
8. Statistics. the value of the variate at which a maximum occurs in the frequency distribution of the variate.
9. the actual mineral composition of a rock, expressed in percentages by weight.
[1250–1300; (< Old French) < Latin modus amount, limit, manner]

mode2

(moʊd)

n.
1. fashion or style in manners, dress, etc.
2. a light gray or drab color.
[1635–45; < French < Latin modus; see mode1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mode

(mōd)
The value that occurs most frequently in a data set. For example, in the set 125, 140, 172, 164, 140, 110, the mode is 140. Compare arithmetic mean, average, median.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mode

  • comportment, deportment - Deportment adds the sense of action or activity to a mode of conduct or behavior; comportment, "behavior or bearing," does not have this.
  • dictionary - Based on Latin dictio(n-), "mode of expression" or "word," then dictionarius, "a repertory of words or phrases."
  • diet - Comes from Greek diaita, "a way of life, mode of living."
  • mode - Originally a tune or air and later a scheme of sounds.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mode - how something is done or how it happensmode - how something is done or how it happens; "her dignified manner"; "his rapid manner of talking"; "their nomadic mode of existence"; "in the characteristic New York style"; "a lonely way of life"; "in an abrasive fashion"
property - a basic or essential attribute shared by all members of a class; "a study of the physical properties of atomic particles"
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
drape - the manner in which fabric hangs or falls; "she adjusted the drape of her skirt"
fit - the manner in which something fits; "I admired the fit of her coat"
form - a particular mode in which something is manifested; "his resentment took the form of extreme hostility"
life style, lifestyle, life-style, modus vivendi - a manner of living that reflects the person's values and attitudes
setup - the way something is organized or arranged; "it takes time to learn the setup around here"
signature, touch - a distinguishing style; "this room needs a woman's touch"
wise - a way of doing or being; "in no wise"; "in this wise"
response - the manner in which an electrical or mechanical device responds to an input signal or a range of input signals
2.mode - a particular functioning condition or arrangementmode - a particular functioning condition or arrangement; "switched from keyboard to voice mode"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
3.mode - a classification of propositions on the basis of whether they claim necessity or possibility or impossibility
logical relation - a relation between propositions
4.mode - verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
grammatical relation - a linguistic relation established by grammar
common mood, declarative, declarative mood, fact mood, indicative, indicative mood - a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact
subjunctive, subjunctive mood - a mood that represents an act or state (not as a fact but) as contingent or possible
optative, optative mood - a mood (as in Greek or Sanskrit) that expresses a wish or hope; expressed in English by modal verbs
imperative, imperative form, imperative mood, jussive mood - a mood that expresses an intention to influence the listener's behavior
interrogative mood, interrogative - some linguists consider interrogative sentences to constitute a mood
5.mode - any of various fixed orders of the various diatonic notes within an octavemode - any of various fixed orders of the various diatonic notes within an octave
diatonic scale - a scale with eight notes in an octave; all but two are separated by whole tones
church mode, ecclesiastical mode, Gregorian mode, medieval mode - any of a system of modes used in Gregorian chants up until 1600; derived historically from the Greek mode
Greek mode - any of the descending diatonic scales in the music of classical Greece
major diatonic scale, major scale - a diatonic scale with notes separated by whole tones except for the 3rd and 4th and 7th and 8th
minor diatonic scale, minor scale - a diatonic scale with notes separated by whole tones except for the 2nd and 3rd and 5th and 6th
6.mode - the most frequent value of a random variable
statistics - a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the collection and interpretation of quantitative data and the use of probability theory to estimate population parameters
average, norm - a statistic describing the location of a distribution; "it set the norm for American homes"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

mode

noun
2. fashion, style, trend, rage, vogue, look, craze Their designs were exterminated by the mode for uncluttered space.
3. function, position, role, operation, capacity The camera is in manual mode.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

mode

noun
1. The approach used to do something:
2. A distinctive way of expressing oneself:
3. Manner of being or form of existence:
4. The current custom:
Informal: thing.
Idioms: the in thing, the last word, the latest thing.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
طَريقَه، شَكْل، أسْلوبموضَه، طِرازوَسيلَه، طَريقَه
druhmódamoduszpůsob
=-mådemådemode
režiimviis
háttur, mátitegund, gerîtíska
stileiviškas
modeveids

mode

[məʊd] N
1. (= way, manner) → manera f, modo m
2. (= fashion) → moda f
3. (Comput) → función f, modalidad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mode

[ˈməʊd] n
[life, behaviour] → mode m
(= setting) to be in manual mode [camera] → être en mode manuel
when the camera is in manual mode → lorsque l'appareil photo est en mode manuel
to be in survival mode (= thinking only of survival) [person, organization] → être en mode survie
to be in panic mode (= be panicking) [person] → être en proie à la panique
(= type) → mode m
the capitalist mode of production → le mode de production capitaliste
mode of dress → mode vestimentaire mode of transport
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mode

n
(Gram) → Modus m; (Mus) → Tonart f; (Philos) → Modalität f
(= way)Art f(und Weise); (= form)Form f; mode of transportTransportmittel nt; mode of lifeLebensweise f; (Biol) → Lebensform f; mode of addressAnrede f
(Fashion) → Mode f; to be the modein Mode sein
(Comput) → Modus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mode

[məʊd] n
a. (gen) → modo, maniera; (of transport) → mezzo (Mus) → modo (Comput) → modalità f inv
b. (fashion) (Math) → moda
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mode

(məud) noun
1. a manner of doing something. an unusual mode of expression.
2. a kind or type. modes of transport.
3. a fashion. Large hats are the latest mode.
ˈmodish adjective
fashionable and smart.
ˈmodishly adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

mode

1. n. moda, manera, valor repetido con mayor frecuencia en una serie;
2. modo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
An exception to this rule are ICDs produced by Sorin (currently very rare in Croatia), which in addition to turning off detection and ventricular arrhythmias (VT/VF), stimulate in the asynchronous mode of pacing (as in pacemakers) (Table 2).
Due to the salient pole construction of the rotor and the asymmetry of the starting winding, the distribution of the magnetic flux density in the air gap differs from the sinusoidal, and the electromagnetic torque in the asynchronous mode has a constant component and a variable one that fluctuates with a double frequency.
There exist two updating modes, the synchronous and asynchronous modes. In the asynchronous mode, only one neuron can update at a time.
Technology effectiveness (TE)--Technology effectiveness was measured in terms of quality of audio and video transmission, clarity of live interaction, ease of use of synchronous and asynchronous mode of interaction during the teacher training workshop conducted in the distance mode.
This mode usually needs to be programmed by a cardiologist prior to and after the MRI scan which leaves the patient in asynchronous mode for a longer period of time than required by the MRI scan itself.
However, the benzene moiety loses about 0.7 electrons at 920 fs, and reversal occurs at 1600 fs in asynchronous mode. This charge transfer at 920 fs indicates that charge transfer plays an important role in the nonadiabatic coupling, which leads to a radiation-less transition in asynchronous [2 + 2] photocycloaddition.
The immediate asynchronous mode is a new coupling mode defined in this research to support concurrent execution of triggering transactions and triggered rules, thus improving the performance of distributed rule processing.
Turn off rate-responsive and antitachycardia features and program the device to asynchronous mode for the procedure duration.
Next best is to place the pacemaker in asynchronous mode, disable its antitachycardia and rate-responsive therapies, and employ true bipolar electrosurgery using short, irregular bursts of energy.
It describes how, taking advantage of its asynchronous mode, SQI constitutes a simple and robust entry point to the networks of metadata and learning object repositories that compose an iClass server.
Most online training is done in the asynchronous mode. Literally, that means "not at the same time," and its significance to you is that you can be working on lessons and taking tests even when your instructor is unavailable.
Blackboard and WebCT, for example, allow students to download course materials, exchange documents, submit and receive assignments, and communicate with each other and the instructor in synchronous and asynchronous mode. The speed and ease with which an instructor can add and remove course users, track course statistics, set access to documents, create and deliver quizzes and anonymous surveys, record and compute grades, to name just a few functions, make Blackboard and WebCT a welcome addition to university courses.

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