at it


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to at it: Have at it

at

 (ăt; ət when unstressed)
prep.
1.
a. In or near the area occupied by; in or near the location of: at the market; at our destination.
b. In or near the position of: always at my side; at the center of the page.
2. To or toward the direction or location of, especially for a specific purpose: Questions came at us from all sides.
3. Present during; attending: at the dance.
4. Within the interval or span of: at the dinner hour; at a glance.
5. In the state or condition of: at peace with one's conscience.
6. In the activity or field of: skilled at playing chess; good at math.
7. To or using the rate, extent, or amount of; to the point of: at 30 cents a pound; at high speed; at 20 paces; at 350°F.
8. On, near, or by the time or age of: at three o'clock; at 72 years of age.
9. On account of; because of: rejoice at a victory.
10. By way of; through: exited at the rear gate.
11. In accord with; following: at my request.
12. Dependent upon: at the mercy of the court.
13. Occupied with: at work.
Idiom:
at it Informal
Engaged in verbal or physical conflict; arguing or fighting: The neighbors are at it again.

[Middle English, from Old English æt; see ad- in Indo-European roots.]

aT

abbr.
attotesla

At

The symbol for astatine.

AT

abbr.
1. air temperature
2. ampere-turn
3. antitank
4. automatic transmission
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Just before Allied Force, which was the air war in Serbia in 1999, we wanted to make certain our networks were secure, so I invited our red teams from Air Intelligence Agency to come over and look at it.
Instead of doing full backups and now incrementals, we look at it differently and use technology with all the MIPS we have available now, toss a little compute power at it, and put in some algorithms and now look at the data and are able to truly break it up into lower components and only send across the wire what's truly changed, and a map of how to rebuild it.
You could even look at it as a pun, since Paul, the person he's writing to, is an archaeologist.
Taking off the pieces that are the most pain for you and then looking at it.