ataxia

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Related to ataxic gait: spastic gait, shuffling gait

a·tax·i·a

 (ə-tăk′sē-ə)
n.
1. Loss of the ability to coordinate muscular movement.
2. Any of various degenerative, often hereditary, disorders that are characterized by ataxia and are frequently associated with cerebellar atrophy.

[Greek ataxiā, disorder : a-, not; see a-1 + taxis, order.]

a·tax′ic adj. & n.

ataxia

(əˈtæksɪə) or

ataxy

n
(Pathology) pathol lack of muscular coordination
[C17: via New Latin from Greek: lack of coordination, from a-1 + -taxia, from tassein to put in order]
aˈtaxic, aˈtactic adj

a•tax•i•a

(əˈtæk si ə)

n.
loss of coordination of the muscles, esp. of the extremities.
[1605–15; < New Latin < Greek: indiscipline]
a•tax′ic, adj.

a·tax·i·a

(ə-tăk′sē-ə)
Loss of muscular coordination as a result of damage to the central nervous system.

ataxia, ataxy

inability to coordinate bodily movements, especially movements of the muscles. See also order and disorder.
See also: Disease and Illness
lack of order; irregularity. See also disease and illness.
See also: Order and Disorder

ataxia

Lack of coordination of the muscles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ataxia - inability to coordinate voluntary muscle movements; unsteady movements and staggering gait
nervous disorder, neurological disease, neurological disorder - a disorder of the nervous system
Friedreich's ataxia, herediatry spinal ataxia - sclerosis of the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord; characterized by muscular weakness and abnormal gait; occurs in children
hereditary cerebellar ataxia - nervous disorder of late childhood and early adulthood; characterized by ataxic gait and hesitating or explosive speech and nystagmus
spinocerebellar disorder - any of several congenital disorders marked by degeneration of the cerebellum and spinal cord resulting in spasticity and ataxia
Translations
ataxie
ataksia

ataxia

[əˈtæksɪə] Nataxia f

ataxia

nAtaxie f

ataxia

n ataxia
References in periodicals archive ?
A 48-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency room with symptoms of fever, malaise, ataxic gait, slurred speech, and urinary incontinence, which abruptly started in one day.
The patient, now aged 19, is found conscious, reactive, cooperative, with sardonic facies, sialorrhea, global aphasia, ataxic gait, lower extremity muscular atrophy, and upper extremity spasticity at grade 3 on Ashworth Scale (Fig.
Vestibulotoxicity may present as general disequilibrium, unsteadiness when walking or ataxic gait, oscillopsia and nystagmus.
On examination, he had slurred speech and wide-based ataxic gait; so he could walk with one-person support.
[21] reported promising evidence with treadmill training only, more strong in 1 of 2 participants with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and ataxic gait. There were gains in cadence, walking speed, step length, mobility, and balance.
Padua et al., "Prefrontal cortex as a compensatory network in ataxic gait: a correlation study between cortical activity and gait parameters," Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, vol.
He had mild intention tremor on finger nose testing and gait assessment revealed a broad based ataxic gait with an inability to tandem walk with an otherwise normal neurological examination.
The patient with a cryptic unbalanced translocation t(14; 15)(q11.1; q11.2) causing monosomy for 15q11 and trisomy for 14q11 presented with an unusual Angelman syndrome with an extremely short stature and severe intellectual disability, lack of speech, and seizure ataxic gait [6].
On early 2016, a 49-year-old man presented to the emergency room (ER) with double vision, bilateral facial paralysis, ataxic gait, ascending weakness, and difficulty walking properly.
Similarly, the gait ataxia is found in majority of patients which varies from mild imbalance and unsteadiness with difficulty in tandem (heel to toe), walking to wide based shuffling or ataxic gait. Polyneuropathy is seen among (60-82%) of patients affecting both the extremities (25%) or affecting the lower extremity (57%).