atelic


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atelic

(eɪˈtɛlɪk)
adj
showing an action or happening as being unfinisheddreadful, revolting or repulsive
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Indeed, much is made of the international art festival as a method of decentering and recentering our preconceived notions of identity, and in recent years, a critical mass of Asia-based biennials, triennials, and art festivals have adopted themes that embrace a future tense, or at least an atelic one--all while (thankfully) placing artists from their regions in ever-greater focus.
Telic verbs are those with a natural endpoint and which do not satisfy the (non-strict) sub-interval condition (Smith 1991): the same description does not properly hold of any random subinterval we select, because any interval that includes the endpoint will have a different denotation (the culmination of the eventuality); atelic verbs are those that satisfy the sub-interval condition.
to eat an apple, to arrive, to open a book), and the imperfective with atelic predicates (e.
High quality contexts would be those that included reference to the less prototypical atelic situations, states, and activities.
The object distributive use underlined by anyad--anyad makes it clear that repeated actions are involved: these are atelic with respect to the point of narration.
Vendler's activities I take to be an agential genus of the species of atelic process.
In contrast to telic verbs, atelic verbs can be interpreted only as imperfective even when they are used in construction with time adverbials.
Telicity is defined as a semantic property that reflects the boundedness of events: predicates that denote bounded events are telic; those that denote unbounded events are atelic.
for [alfa] time changes an atelic VP to a telic one, while in a time leaves the telic VP telic" (ROTHSTEIN, 2004, p.
The combination of preverbs with verbs denoting atelic processes, like 'to write, to eat, to do' and other similar difiuse lexemes, seems to produce Perfective forms which do no differ lexically from the simple verbs from which they are derived; if the preverb has lost its spatial meaning and developed into a perfectivity marker, it can be deemed empty (Dickey 2006: 105).
14) These verbs are also called degree achievement verbs (Dowty, 1979) and atelic verbs of state (Levin & Rappaport, 1995).
movement is atelic, an imperfect act, without an end'.

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