atheroma

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Related to atheromata: Foam cells

ath·er·o·ma

 (ăth′ə-rō′mə)
n. pl. ath·er·o·mas or ath·er·o·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A lipid-containing lesion that forms on the innermost layer of the wall of an artery in atherosclerosis; a plaque.

[Latin athērōma, tumor full of pus that is like gruel, from Greek, from athēra, gruel, variant of atharē, gruel, perhaps of Egyptian origin, or perhaps from an Indo-European adstrate source akin to Hittite ḫattar, a kind of grain or pulse, and Latin ador, emmer.]

ath′er·o·ma·to′sis (-tō′sĭs) n.
ath′er·om′a·tous (-rŏm′ə-təs, -rō′mə-) adj.

atheroma

(ˌæθəˈrəʊmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
(Pathology) pathol a fatty deposit on or within the inner lining of an artery, often causing an obstruction to the blood flow
[C18: via Latin from Greek athērōma tumour full of matter resembling gruel, from athēra gruel]
atheromatous adj

ath•er•o•ma

(ˌæθ əˈroʊ mə)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
1. a sebaceous cyst.
2. an abnormal deposition of plaque and fibrous matter on the inner wall of an artery.
[1700–10; < New Latin, Latin: a tumor filled with gruellike matter < Greek athḗrōma=athḗr(ē) gruel + -ōma -oma]
ath`er•om′a•tous (-ˈrɒm ə təs, -ˈroʊ mə-) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.atheroma - a fatty deposit in the intima (inner lining) of an artery; can obstruct blood flow
adipose tissue, fatty tissue, fat - a kind of body tissue containing stored fat that serves as a source of energy; it also cushions and insulates vital organs; "fatty tissue protected them from the severe cold"
Translations

ath·er·o·ma

n. ateroma, depósito graso o lípido en la capa íntima de una arteria que causa endurecimiento de la misma.

atheroma

n ateroma m
References in periodicals archive ?
Human atheromata express IL-18 and increased concentrations of its receptor subunits, IL-18R [alpha]/[beta] (40).
Advanced complex atheromata exhibit a paucity of SMCs at sites of rupture and abundant macrophages, key histological characteristics of plaques that have ruptured and caused fatal coronary thrombosis.
Similarly, cytokines induced by extravascular infection (specifically interleukin-6) characteristically elicit hepatic synthesis of acute-phase reactants, some of which might promote atheromata complicated by thrombosis.