athlete's heart


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Related to athlete's heart: athlete's foot
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Noun1.athlete's heart - enlarged heart commonly found among athletes trained for enduranceathlete's heart - enlarged heart commonly found among athletes trained for endurance
ticker, heart, pump - the hollow muscular organ located behind the sternum and between the lungs; its rhythmic contractions move the blood through the body; "he stood still, his heart thumping wildly"
References in periodicals archive ?
Doctors have told him he has "athlete's heart syndrome", when one half of the heart grows bigger as a result of training.
Changes in the heart structure and function following periods of sport training are grouped under the term athlete's heart. This condition is mainly bradycardia and in echocardiography, a proportionally more marked dilatation of the left ventricle (LV) cavity than the wall hypertrophy.
* The athlete's heart is a big engine with "supranormal" filling and ejection.
Australian cardiologist Andre La Gerche, PhD, opened the morning lectures with a talk focusing on anomalies of the athlete's heart while long-time AMAA member and cardiologist Paul Thompson, MD, focused on lipid management for the runner and physical therapist Michael Silva outlined strategies for overuse injury prevention and recovery.
Electrocardiogram changes in athletes are common and usually reflect structural and electrical remodeling of the heart as an adaptation to regular physical training (athlete's heart).
If the problem is that EKGs are likely to be misread, the solution is to make sure that they are performed by skilled cardiologists who can either take into account the normal remodeling of an athlete's heart, or order follow-up tests that will confirm a diagnosis.
Regular sport training causes several morphological and functional modifications [1] in all the myocardial chambers, so called athlete's heart, where also the right ventricle (RV) chamber is normally involved.
This condition is described as athlete's heart or exercise related myocardial remodeling, and it is characterized by increases in the chamber size, wall thickness and left ventricular (LV) mass.
"It is absolutely vital that clinicians carrying out pre-participation screening in elite athletes are carried out by expert cardiologists with specific experience of the athlete's heart -- which can look and behave differently to a non-athlete's," Cox said.