atlas


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At·las

 (ăt′ləs)
n.
1. Greek Mythology A Titan condemned by Zeus to support the heavens upon his shoulders.
2. atlas A person who supports a great burden.

[Greek Atlās; see telə- in Indo-European roots.]

at·las

 (ăt′ləs)
n. pl. at·las·es
1. A book or bound collection of maps, sometimes with supplementary illustrations and graphic analyses.
2. A volume of tables, charts, or plates that systematically illustrates a particular subject: an anatomical atlas.
3. A large size of drawing paper, measuring 26 × 33 or 26 × 34 inches.
4. pl. at·lan·tes (ăt-lăn′tēz) Architecture A standing or kneeling figure of a man used as a supporting column, as for an entablature or balcony. Also called telamon.
5. Anatomy The top or first cervical vertebra of the neck, which supports the skull.

[After Atlas. Sense 1, probably from depictions of Atlas holding the world on his shoulders that appeared on the frontispieces of early works of this kind.]

atlas

(ˈætləs)
npl atlantes
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a collection of maps, usually in book form
2. (Journalism & Publishing) a book of charts, graphs, etc, illustrating aspects of a subject: an anatomical atlas.
3. (Anatomy) anatomy the first cervical vertebra, attached to and supporting the skull in man. Compare axis1
4. (Architecture) architect another name for telamon
5. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a standard size of drawing paper, 26 × 17 inches
[C16: via Latin from Greek; first applied to maps, from depictions of Atlas supporting the heavens in 16th-century collections of maps]

Atlas

(ˈætləs)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a Titan compelled to support the sky on his shoulders as punishment for rebelling against Zeus
2. (Astronautics) a US intercontinental ballistic missile, also used in launching spacecraft
3. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a US intercontinental ballistic missile, also used in launching spacecraft
4. (Celestial Objects) astronomy a small satellite of Saturn, discovered in 1980

at•las

(ˈæt ləs)

n., pl. at•las•es for 1-3, at•lan•tes (ætˈlæn tiz)
for 5.
1. a bound collection of maps.
2. a bound volume of charts, plates, or tables illustrating any subject.
3. the first cervical vertebra, which supports the head.
4. Also called telamon. a sculptural figure of a man used as a column.Compare caryatid.
[1580–90 in sense “prop, support”; as name for a collection of maps, said to be from illustrations of Atlas supporting the globe in early books of this kind]

At•las

(ˈæt ləs)

n., pl. At•las•es.
1. a Titan, condemned by Zeus to support the sky on his shoulders.
2. a person who supports a heavy burden; mainstay.

atlas

(or Telemon) A male statue used as a column, as in an ancient Greek temple.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.atlas - (Greek mythology) a Titan who was forced by Zeus to bear the sky on his shouldersAtlas - (Greek mythology) a Titan who was forced by Zeus to bear the sky on his shoulders
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
2.atlas - a collection of maps in book formatlas - a collection of maps in book form  
book of facts, reference book, reference work, reference - a book to which you can refer for authoritative facts; "he contributed articles to the basic reference work on that topic"
gazetteer - a geographical dictionary (as at the back of an atlas)
dialect atlas, linguistic atlas - an atlas showing the distribution of distinctive linguistic features
3.atlas - the 1st cervical vertebraatlas - the 1st cervical vertebra    
cervical vertebra, neck bone - one of 7 vertebrae in the human spine located in the neck region
4.atlas - a figure of a man used as a supporting columnatlas - a figure of a man used as a supporting column
pillar, column - (architecture) a tall vertical cylindrical structure standing upright and used to support a structure
Translations
أَطْلَسأطْلَس
atlas
atlas
atlaskoljusammas
kartastoatlaskannattajanikama
atlas
atlasz
atlas, landakortabók
地図帳
지도책
atlasas
atlants
atlasdźwigacz
atlas
atlas
Atlas
สมุดแผนที่
tập bản đồ

atlas

[ˈætləs]
A. N
1. (= world atlas) → atlas m inv; (= road atlas) → guía f de carreteras
2. Atlas (Myth) → Atlas m, Atlante m
B. CPD the Atlas Mountains NPLlos Atlas

atlas

[ˈætləs] n (= book of maps) → atlas m

atlas

nAtlas m

Atlas

[ˈætləs] n (Myth) → Atlante m

atlas

[ˈætləs] natlante m

atlas

(ˈӕtləs) noun
a book of maps. My atlas is out of date.

atlas

أَطْلَس atlas atlas Atlas άτλας atlas kartasto atlas atlas atlante 地図帳 지도책 atlas atlas atlas atlas атлас atlas สมุดแผนที่ atlas tập bản đồ 地图集
References in classic literature ?
This daughter of Atlas has got hold of poor unhappy Ulysses, and keeps trying by every kind of blandishment to make him forget his home, so that he is tired of life, and thinks of nothing but how he may once more see the smoke of his own chimneys.
If you were asked to hunt the lion in the plains of Atlas, or the tiger in the Indian jungles, what would you say?
We were then, for reasons which it is not worth while to specify, in the close neighbourhood of Kerguelen Land; and now, when I open an atlas and look at the tiny dots on the map of the Southern Ocean, I see as if engraved upon the paper the enraged physiognomy of that gale.
Then they talked of horses, of the races, of what they had been doing that day, and of how smartly Vronsky's Atlas had won the first prize.
I can speed onward with the rapidity of a tornado, sometimes at the loftiest heights, sometimes only a hundred feet above the soil, while the map of Africa unrolls itself beneath my gaze in the great atlas of the world.
They repeated to each other, while pillaging his hotel, that he was sent to Gigelli by the king to reconstruct his lost fortunes; that the treasures of Africa would be equally divided between the admiral and the king of France; that these treasures consisted in mines of diamonds, or other fabulous stones; the gold and silver mines of Mount Atlas did not even obtain the honor of being named.
A New York directory and an atlas were at his elbow.
3] The Cerographic Atlas of the United States (1842-1845), by Sidney Edwards Morse (1794-1871), son of the geographer, Jedidiah Morse, and brother of the painter-inventor, Samuel F.
Far to the south rose the dim lines of the Saharan Atlas range.
Failing in them, he got out a big atlas, and, though.
Her teachers complained that instead of doing her sums she covered her slate with animals, the blank pages of her atlas were used to copy maps on, and caricatures of the most ludicrous description came fluttering out of all her books at unlucky moments.
One was an atlas, which I found opened naturally to England, as if that map had been much used.

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