atmospherically


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

at·mos·pher·ic

 (ăt′mə-sfîr′ĭk, -sfĕr′-) also at·mos·pher·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or existing in the atmosphere.
2. Produced by, dependent on, or coming from the atmosphere.
3. Resembling or representing the atmosphere; having or giving the effect of translucence: a painting suffused with a hazy, atmospheric glow.
4. Intended to evoke a particular emotional tone or aesthetic quality: lush atmospheric touches in every room.

at′mos·pher′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
A man should not go where he cannot carry his whole sphere or society with him,--not bodily, the whole circle of his friends, but atmospherically. He should preserve in a new company the same attitude of mind and reality of relation which his daily associates draw him to, else he is shorn of his best beams, and will be an orphan in the merriest club.
With designer Paul Barrett providing an outsized domestic setting, including a giant Bakelite radio, based on Polish examples of the time, atmospherically lit by Wayne Dowdeswell, the production values are lavish by community theatre standards.
"It was a great scene and atmospherically it couldn't be done any other way.
The piece is atmospherically charged and sounded stunning in the huge acoustic.
This will be the first time the archive of Merseyside and Cheshire scenes and showbusiness portraits, dating from the 1920s, will be stored in atmospherically controlled conditions.
The play takes place in a single shabby room, atmospherically rendered by set designer Riccardo Hernandez and lit by Scott Zielinski, that's populated by brothers named Lincoln (Wright) and Booth (Cheadle).
If one cannot find an order here, it is because I prefer to call his work a phenomenon, an atmospherically charged space: there are seven working televisions, two of which are playing techno-music already in front of the door; there is a small one in the window that shows someone dancing--"Jack in the Box"--behind a hole in a file binder.
I question why tyres being "soft" or "hard" can cause so much frustration and where, despite the vast amounts of money the sport generates, the communications systems within the cars appear to be capable only of receiving atmospherically inaudible instructions from Mars.
As she writes in her introduction: "Many of the priceless volumes of great artists such as John James Audubon, Ulisse Aldrovandi, Conrad Gesner and John Gould are hidden away in the atmospherically controlled inner sanctums of the world's greatest libraries; safe, but seldom to be browsed over for sheer enjoyment." Others are in private hands, "hanging high on the shadowy walls of stately homes".
This was an account which looked determinedly forward, aided by conductor Yannick Nezet-Seguin's atmospherically dramatic shading of the orchestral tutti (we could almost be in the middle of the Pastoral Symphony's storm, and with scarcely a look back to the music's Mozartean ancestry - except in the eloquent woodwind solos, deliciously delivered here.
THE priceless photographic archive built up in Liverpool by the internationally renowned Edward ChambrY Hardman is set to be moved into atmospherically controlled conditions for the first time.
Little-known cast is strong, and lenser Fabio Olmi does an efficient job, especially in the atmospherically shot first seg, in which images communicate far more than the minimal dialogue.