atomism


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Related to atomism: logical atomism

at·om·ism

 (ăt′ə-mĭz′əm)
n. Philosophy
1. The ancient theory of Democritus, Epicurus, and Lucretius, according to which simple, minute, indivisible, and indestructible particles are the basic components of the entire universe.
2. A theory according to which social institutions, values, and processes arise solely from the acts and interests of individuals, who thus constitute the only true subject of analysis.

at′om·ist n.

atomism

(ˈætəˌmɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) an ancient philosophical theory, developed by Democritus and expounded by Lucretius, that the ultimate constituents of the universe are atoms. See atom3
2. (Philosophy)
a. any of a number of theories that hold that some objects or phenomena can be explained as constructed out of a small number of distinct types of simple indivisible entities
b. any theory that holds that an understanding of the parts is logically prior to an understanding of the whole. Compare holism3
3. (Psychology) psychol the theory that experiences and mental states are composed of elementary units
ˈatomist n, adj
ˌatomˈistic, ˌatomˈistical adj
ˌatomˈistically adv

at•om•ism

(ˈæt əˌmɪz əm)

n.
the theory that minute, discrete, and indivisible elements are the ultimate constituents of all matter.
[1670–80]
at′om•ist, n.
at`om•is′tic, adj.
at`om•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

atomism

the theory that minute, discrete, finite, and indivisible elements are the ultimate constituents of all matter. Also called atomic theory. — atomist, n.atomistic, atomistical, adj.
See also: Philosophy

atomism

In Greek philosophy, the notion that matter is made up particles of solid matter moving in empty space.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.atomism - (psychology) a theory that reduces all mental phenomena to simple elements (sensations and feelings) that form complex ideas by association
scientific theory - a theory that explains scientific observations; "scientific theories must be falsifiable"
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
2.atomism - (chemistry) any theory in which all matter is composed of tiny discrete finite indivisible indestructible particles; "the ancient Greek philosophers Democritus and Epicurus held atomic theories of the universe"
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
holism, holistic theory - the theory that the parts of any whole cannot exist and cannot be understood except in their relation to the whole; "holism holds that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts"; "holistic theory has been applied to ecology and language and mental states"
Translations

atomism

n (Philos) → Atomismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
The theologians' (mutakallimun) rejection of Aristotle's notion of the infinite and of his theory of the eternity of the world was backed by a peculiar form of atomism developed in early kalam (not to be confused with Democritus' or the Epicureans' atomism).
He argues that seeing Searle's work as an advancement of an ideal type (in the Weberian sense) allows Searle to avoid criticisms that his formula is no more than a form of institutional atomism. However, as an ideal type, Searle's constitutive formula both highlights and suppresses aspects of institutional reality and thus can only serve as one instrument for attending inquiry among other ideal types, such as the Aristotelian conception of the phronimos.
The essays themselves fall into a number of categories, the first of which comprises those which explore Bacon's relationship with the past, such as Reid Barbour's tracing of his on/off relationship with Democritus and Atomism, and Michael McCanles's consideration of his debt to late medieval nominalism and transcendental mysticism.
Mariano Artigas, Rafael Martinez and William Shea suggest the possibility that the Inquisition might also have been interested in Galileo's controversial work on atomism. Questions regarding the atomic structure of nature had serious implications for the transubstantiation of the Eucharist.
Some Ontological Consequences of Atomism, TRAVIS DUMSDAY
They held matter to be fundamentally infused with vital and occult powers, and their atomism owed much more to the decidedly non-Epicurean tradition of late scholastic and Renaissance doctrines of minima naturalia, where the particles were not properly atomic but simply the smallest particles capable of containing the substantial form in question and where the principles of interaction were not mechanical.
Webb critiques the global liberal culture and outlines four "ethoses"--character ideals or ways of life that he labels demoticism, perfectionism, atomism, and virtuocracy.
While maintaining that the concept of seed was central to Renaissance matter theory and that it played a role in the formation of modern Western science, it is unclear to what extent Hirai wants to link the centrality of this concept to the development of modern atomism or other aspects of seventeenth-century science such as the "mechanical philosophy." While Hirai connects the concept of seeds to Gassendi, he is silent on whether the concept had any place in the thought of Francis Bacon, Rene Descartes, Robert Boyle, and many others who are typically considered key to the development of modern science.
The chapter articulates a particularly incisive treatment of hylemorphism and atomism, and it includes a discussion of antireductionism in contemporary analytic philosophy.
Weber's argument is that it is only through appreciating this radical innovation that it becomes possible to understand why Whitehead embraced a form of atomism of 'actual occasions' to characterize this creative advance, and shows how Whitehead gave a place to subjective, objective and relative time, and revealed the inter-relationship between creative becoming associated with subjective experience, objects and the extensive continuum.
Ablondi places Cordemoy within seventeenth-century thought and breaks down his attachment to atomism, occasionalism and Cartesianism in turn, explaining Cordemoy's approach and methods as well as his results.
Although Bacon's matter theory has some elements in common with classical atomism, it differs significantly by invoking "various mechanical qualities such as elasticity and pressure in a basic explanatory role," and also draws on chemical/alchemical theory (140).