heart block

(redirected from atrioventricular heart block)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

heart block

n.
A condition in which faulty transmission of the impulses that control the heartbeat results in a lack of coordination in the contraction of the atria and ventricles of the heart.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

heart block

n
(Pathology) impaired conduction or blocking of the impulse that regulates the heartbeat, resulting in a lack of coordination between the beating of the atria and the ventricles. Also called: Adams-Stokes syndrome or atrioventricular block
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

heart′ block`


n.
a defect in the electrical impulses of the heart resulting in any of various arrhythmias or irregularities in the heartbeat.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

heart block

A condition in which the electrical impulses in the heart are blocked at points in the conduction system.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heart block - recurrent sudden attacks of unconsciousness caused by impaired conduction of the impulse that regulates the heartbeatheart block - recurrent sudden attacks of unconsciousness caused by impaired conduction of the impulse that regulates the heartbeat
arrhythmia, cardiac arrhythmia - an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heart
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
[4] Complete atrioventricular heart block (CAVB) is a rare complication of myocarditis and contributes to further haemodynamic compromise.
An 81-year-old woman was admitted to hospital for symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) in July 2010, with a history of moderate AS, mild-moderate aortic regurgitation, moderate mitral regurgitation, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and pacemaker implantation for a 2:1 atrioventricular heart block. According to the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification, she had class 4 symptoms despite a preserved ejection fraction of 65 - 70%.

Full browser ?