atrocity


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a·troc·i·ty

 (ə-trŏs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. a·troc·i·ties
1. Appalling or atrocious condition, quality, or behavior; monstrousness.
2. An appalling or atrocious act, situation, or object, especially an act of unusual or illegal cruelty inflicted by an armed force on civilians or prisoners.

atrocity

(əˈtrɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. behaviour or an action that is wicked or ruthless
2. the fact or quality of being atrocious
3. (usually plural) acts of extreme cruelty, esp against prisoners or civilians in wartime

a•troc•i•ty

(əˈtrɒs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality or state of being atrocious.
2. an atrocious act, thing, or circumstance.
[1525–35; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.atrocity - the quality of being shockingly cruel and inhumaneatrocity - the quality of being shockingly cruel and inhumane
inhumaneness, inhumanity - the quality of lacking compassion or consideration for others
2.atrocity - an act of atrocious crueltyatrocity - an act of atrocious cruelty    
cruelty, inhuman treatment - a cruel act; a deliberate infliction of pain and suffering
barbarism, barbarity, brutality, savagery - a brutal barbarous savage act
outrage - a wantonly cruel act
enormity - an act of extreme wickedness

atrocity

atrocity

noun
1. The quality of passing all moral bounds:
3. A monstrous offense or evil:
Translations
عَمَل وَحْشي، جَريمَه فَظيعَه
зверство
atrocitat
zvěrstvokrutost
grusomhed
פשע נגד האנושות
atrocitás
grimmdarverk, ódæîi
atrocitas
atrocitate
ukrutnosťzverstvo
canavarlıkvahşet

atrocity

[əˈtrɒsɪtɪ] Natrocidad f

atrocity

[əˈtrɒsɪti] natrocité f

atrocity

nGrausamkeit f; (act also) → Gräueltat f

atrocity

[əˈtrɒsɪtɪ] natrocità f inv

atrocious

(əˈtrəuʃəs) adjective
1. very bad. Your handwriting is atrocious.
2. extremely cruel. an atrocious crime.
aˈtrociousness noun
atrocity (əˈtrosəti) noun
an extremely cruel and wicked act. The invading army committed many atrocities.
References in classic literature ?
I blush, I burn, I shudder, while I pen the damnable atrocity.
The curate, I found, was quite incapable of dis- cussion; this new and culminating atrocity had robbed him of all vestiges of reason or forethought.
"Verily do I believe we owe our victory to you alone; so do not mar the record of a noble deed by wanton acts of atrocity."
The rest of the monkey orchestra merely shivered in apprehension of what next atrocity should be perpetrated.
But, in fact, an instance of similar barbarity is to be found nearer home, and occurs in the annals of Queen Mary's time, containing so many other examples of atrocity. Every reader must recollect, that after the fall of the Catholic Church, and the Presbyterian Church Government had been established by law, the rank, and especially the wealth, of the Bishops, Abbots, Priors, and so forth, were no longer vested in ecclesiastics, but in lay impropriators of the church revenues, or, as the Scottish lawyers called them, titulars of the temporalities of the benefice, though having no claim to the spiritual character of their predecessors in office.
By some mysterious law of nature you invariably guess wrong, and are thereupon regarded by all the relatives and friends as a mixture of fool and knave, the enormity of alluding to a male babe as "she" being only equaled by the atrocity of referring to a female infant as "he".
Some fine day Gryphus will commit some atrocity. I am losing my patience, since I have lost the joy and company of Rosa, and especially since I have lost my tulip.
He will no more than pay the price of listening to a lecture for any atrocity he commits."
Slurk, of course, read the GAZETTE; and each gentleman audibly expressed his contempt at the other's compositions by bitter laughs and sarcastic sniffs; whence they proceeded to more open expressions of opinion, such as 'absurd,' 'wretched,' 'atrocity,' 'humbug,'
He then asked me, suddenly, if I had observed any thing peculiar at the scene of the atrocity.
The Baltimore Amer- ican, of March 17, 1845, relates a similar case of atrocity, perpetrated with similar impunity--as fol- lows:--"~Shooting a slave.~--We learn, upon the au- thority of a letter from Charles county, Maryland, received by a gentleman of this city, that a young man, named Matthews, a nephew of General Mat- thews, and whose father, it is believed, holds an of- fice at Washington, killed one of the slaves upon his father's farm by shooting him.
Once ashore he kept out of sight of the two-story atrocity that bore the legend "Hotel" to lure unsuspecting wayfarers to its multitudinous discomforts.