gingiva

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Related to attached gingiva: alveolar mucosa

gin·gi·va

 (jĭn′jə-və, jĭn-jī′-)
n. pl. gin·gi·vae (-vē′)
See gum2.

[Latin gingīva.]

gingiva

(ˈdʒɪndʒɪvə; dʒɪnˈdʒaɪvə)
n, pl -givae (-dʒɪˌviː; -ˈdʒaɪviː)
(Anatomy) anatomy the technical name for gum2
[from Latin]
ˈgingival adj

gum1

(gʌm)

n., v. gummed, gum•ming. n.
1. any of various viscid, amorphous exudations from plants, hardening on exposure to air and soluble in or forming a viscid mass with water.
2. any of various similar exudations, as resin.
3. a sticky, adhesive preparation of such a plant substance, as for use in the arts or bookbinding.
6. the adhesive by which a postage stamp is affixed.
v.t.
7. to smear, stiffen, or stick together with gum.
8. to clog with or as if with a gummy substance.
v.i.
9. to exude or form gum.
10. to become gummy.
11. to become clogged with a gummy substance.
12. gum up, Slang. to spoil or ruin.
[1350–1400; gomme < Old French « Latin gummi, cummi < Greek kómmi < Egyptian kmyt]
gum′less, adj.

gum2

(gʌm)

n., v. gummed, gum•ming. n.
1. Often, gums. Also called gingiva. the firm, fleshy tissue covering the surfaces of the jaws and enveloping the necks of the teeth.
v.t.
2. to masticate with toothless gums.
3. to shape or renew the teeth of (a saw).
[1275–1325; Middle English gome, Old English gōma palate; akin to Old High German guomo, Old Norse gōmr palate]

gin·gi·va

(jĭn′jə-və)
The gums of the mouth. ♦ Inflammation of the gums is called gingivitis (jĭn′jə-vī′tĭs).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gingiva - the tissue (covered by mucous membrane) of the jaws that surrounds the bases of the teethgingiva - the tissue (covered by mucous membrane) of the jaws that surrounds the bases of the teeth
animal tissue - the tissue in the bodies of animals
mouth, oral cavity, oral fissure, rima oris - the opening through which food is taken in and vocalizations emerge; "he stuffed his mouth with candy"
Translations

gingiva

n (pl -vae) encía
References in periodicals archive ?
Diffused gingival overgrowth involving marginal, papillary, and attached gingiva in the maxillary and mandibular arches was shown in Figure 1.
Adequate zone of keratinized gingiva and thickness of attached gingiva are thought to be essential in order to maintain periodontal health and prevent the easy progression of periodontal disease.
9,10 Whereas its disadvantages are that the amount of keratinized attached gingiva that is the pre requisite, probable recession at donor site, dehiscence or fenestration at donor and limitation to only 1 or 2 teeth.
In this 50-year-old woman; a wide rugose cauliflower-like exophytic lesion on the attached gingiva in the anterior region thought to be epulis fissuratum or a giant-cell granuloma turned out to be condyloma acuminatum following the excisional biopsy.
8) The papillomatous variant is less common and is usually located on the masticatory mucosa such as the tongue and attached gingiva.
After completion of the treatment, the exposed incisors exhibited an acceptable gingival contour and attached gingiva (Figures 6 and 7).
Intraoral examination revealed missing 15, Root canal treated 13,14,16,17, and a solitary well-defined swelling on right side of the hard palate measuring approximately 2x1cm extending anterio-posteriorly from mesial half of 16 to maxillary tuberosity, medio-laterally extending from mid palatine raphae to attached gingiva of 16,17.
Drug induced gingival overgrowth starts as a bead like fibrotic generalized papillary enlargement & involves the attached gingiva in later stages.
Sao Paulo, Brazil), not inserted into the aluminum capsule, since the thickness of the attached gingiva varies between 1 and 1.
The patient, a 19-year-old female, presented with a dome-shaped lesion of normal mucosal color on the attached gingiva apical to tooth number 11.
The main agents causing gingival recession that have been described in the literature are dental plaque, (1) destructive periodontal disease, (2,3) mechanical trauma, (4,5) areas with absence or a narrow zone (width) of attached gingiva, (6) muscular inserts near the gingival margin, (7) reduced thickness of the alveolar bone in the buccolingual side, (8,9) root prominence, (10) irregular tooth alignment in the dental arch, (11) margins of gingival restorations (12,13) and viruses.
The soft tissue appears to be delicate and friable with minimal amount of attached gingiva and thin labial plate with possible presence of dehiscence and fenestrations.