attaint

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at·taint

 (ə-tānt′)
tr.v. at·taint·ed, at·taint·ing, at·taints
1. To impart a stigma to; disgrace: "No breath of calumny ever attainted the personal purity of Savonarola" (Henry Hart Milman).
2. To pass a sentence of attainder against.
3. Archaic To infect or corrupt, as with illness or vice.
4. Archaic To accuse.
n.
1. A disgrace; a stigma.
2. Obsolete Attainder.

[Middle English attainten, from Old French ataint, past participle of ataindre, to affect; see attain.]

attaint

(əˈteɪnt)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) to pass judgment of death or outlawry upon (a person); condemn by bill of attainder
2. to dishonour or disgrace
3. to accuse or prove to be guilty
4. (of sickness) to affect or strike (somebody)
n
5. (Law) a less common word for attainder
6. a dishonour; taint
[C14: from Old French ateint convicted, from ateindre to attain]

at•taint

(əˈteɪnt)

v.t.
1. to punish with attainder.
2. to disgrace.
3. Archaic. to accuse.
4. Obs. to prove the guilt of.
n.
5. Obs. a stain; disgrace; taint.
[1250–1300; Middle English ataynten, derivative of ataynt convicted < Anglo-French, Old French, past participle of ataindre to convict, attain]

attaint


Past participle: attainted
Gerund: attainting

Imperative
attaint
attaint
Present
I attaint
you attaint
he/she/it attaints
we attaint
you attaint
they attaint
Preterite
I attainted
you attainted
he/she/it attainted
we attainted
you attainted
they attainted
Present Continuous
I am attainting
you are attainting
he/she/it is attainting
we are attainting
you are attainting
they are attainting
Present Perfect
I have attainted
you have attainted
he/she/it has attainted
we have attainted
you have attainted
they have attainted
Past Continuous
I was attainting
you were attainting
he/she/it was attainting
we were attainting
you were attainting
they were attainting
Past Perfect
I had attainted
you had attainted
he/she/it had attainted
we had attainted
you had attainted
they had attainted
Future
I will attaint
you will attaint
he/she/it will attaint
we will attaint
you will attaint
they will attaint
Future Perfect
I will have attainted
you will have attainted
he/she/it will have attainted
we will have attainted
you will have attainted
they will have attainted
Future Continuous
I will be attainting
you will be attainting
he/she/it will be attainting
we will be attainting
you will be attainting
they will be attainting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been attainting
you have been attainting
he/she/it has been attainting
we have been attainting
you have been attainting
they have been attainting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been attainting
you will have been attainting
he/she/it will have been attainting
we will have been attainting
you will have been attainting
they will have been attainting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been attainting
you had been attainting
he/she/it had been attainting
we had been attainting
you had been attainting
they had been attainting
Conditional
I would attaint
you would attaint
he/she/it would attaint
we would attaint
you would attaint
they would attaint
Past Conditional
I would have attainted
you would have attainted
he/she/it would have attainted
we would have attainted
you would have attainted
they would have attainted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.attaint - bring shame or dishonor uponattaint - bring shame or dishonor upon; "he dishonored his family by committing a serious crime"
befoul, maculate, defile, foul - spot, stain, or pollute; "The townspeople defiled the river by emptying raw sewage into it"
2.attaint - condemn by attainder; "the man was attainted"
condemn - demonstrate the guilt of (someone); "Her strange behavior condemned her"

attaint

noun
Archaic. A mark of discredit or disgrace:
Idiom: a blot on one's escutcheon.
References in classic literature ?
It is with inexpressible astonishment that I bear them attainted of pessimism, as if the teaching of a man whose ideal was simple goodness must mean the prevalence of evil.
No person shall be convicted of treason, unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open court." And clause 3, of the same section -- "The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of treason; but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of the person attainted."
The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person attainted.
If, he said, there are sacred treasures in the city, he will confiscate and spend them; and in so far as the fortunes of attainted persons may suffice, he will be able to diminish the taxes which he would otherwise have to impose upon the people.
In her engagement with historical models, Clifford evidently found especially resonant the example of one of her ancestors, Henry de Clifford (1454-1523), the so-called "Shepherd Lord," who was denied his title and estates for twenty-four years because his father was attainted of high treason by Act of Parliament.
The plot was uncovered, Norfolk was executed, and Westmoreland was exiled, his estates attainted. After the attaindre of her husband's estates, Joanna was supported by a government pension (Sharpe 1840).
In the third dissent, Justice Jackson reminded the Court that "if any fundamental assumption underlies our system, it is that guilt is personal and not inheritable." (15) Article III of the Constitution, he said, specifically forbade punishment because of treasonable acts by parents or ancestors: "no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person attainted." And yet here was an attempt by the government "to make an otherwise innocent act a crime merely because this prisoner is the son of parents as to whom he had no choice, and belongs to a race from which there is no way to resign." (16) He warned of the dangers when the Court lends its endorsement to military orders:
Rather, Orr is concerned with explicating the reasoning, sources and argumentation behind the theory of treason at Charles's trial, and with outlining the progressive re-conceptualizations of treason between early 1641 (when Charles's unpopular servant, Thomas Wentworth, earl of Strafford, was first impeached and then attainted), and the trial of his royal master some eight years later.
McCormack and Kim Walker point out in their introduction to Edgeworth's novel, Grace's name strongly associates her with Irishness to the initiated reader: "She is one of an attainted family, celebrated in the folk tradition of a displaced and depressed nobility.
At the same time, King and prelates were engaging in a good deal of acting: the Cardinal of York, who had been attainted the previous year--and who would indeed be dead by Christmas--was speaking 'fair' to the people to try to persuade them that he spoke true, while the King himself, as so often in Hall, was keeping his own counsel and 'dissembled the matter to see what he [i.e.
you have discovered a point worthy the consideration; for heereby not onely the English subject findeth no indifference in deciding of his cause, bee it never so iust; but the Queene, as well in all pleas of the crowne, as also in inquiries for escheates, lands attainted, wardshipps, concealments, and all such like, is abused and exceedingly damaged.
* Those who had been attainted or convicted of treason, felony or other infamous offence unless pardoned or having completed their sentence.