attended


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at·tend

 (ə-tĕnd′)
v. at·tend·ed, at·tend·ing, at·tends
v.tr.
1.
a. To be present at: attended the lecture.
b. To go regularly to: attended class every Tuesday and Thursday.
2. To accompany as a circumstance or follow as a result: The speech was attended by wild applause.
3.
a. To take care of (a sick person, for example). See Synonyms at tend2.
b. To accompany or wait upon as a companion or servant.
4. To take charge of: They attended our affairs during our absence.
5. To listen to; heed: attended my every word.
6. Archaic To wait for; expect.
v.intr.
1. To be present, as at a scheduled event.
2. To take care; give attention: We'll attend to that problem later.
3. To apply or direct oneself; take action: attended to their business.
4. To pay attention: attended disinterestedly to the debate.
5. To remain ready to serve; wait.
6. Obsolete To delay or wait.

[Middle English attenden, from Old French atendre, from Latin attendere, to heed : ad-, ad- + tendere, to stretch; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

at·tend′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.attended - playing or singing with instrumental or vocal accompaniment
2.attended - having a caretaker or other watcherattended - having a caretaker or other watcher
cared-for - having needed care and attention; "well-cared-for children"
References in classic literature ?
In every meeting of the kind Willoughby was included; and the ease and familiarity which naturally attended these parties were exactly calculated to give increasing intimacy to his acquaintance with the Dashwoods, to afford him opportunity of witnessing the excellencies of Marianne, of marking his animated admiration of her, and of receiving, in her behaviour to himself, the most pointed assurance of her affection.
Her insipidity was invariable, for even her spirits were always the same; and though she did not oppose the parties arranged by her husband, provided every thing were conducted in style and her two eldest children attended her, she never appeared to receive more enjoyment from them than she might have experienced in sitting at home;-- and so little did her presence add to the pleasure of the others, by any share in their conversation, that they were sometimes only reminded of her being amongst them by her solicitude about her troublesome boys.
For the queen, whom I always attended, never went farther when she accompanied the king in his progresses, and there staid till his majesty returned from viewing his frontiers.
This was always the office of some grave trusty servant, in whom I could confide, whether I attended the king and queen in their progresses, or were disposed to see the gardens, or pay a visit to some great lady or minister of state in the court, when Glumdalclitch happened to be out of order; for I soon began to be known and esteemed among the greatest officers, I suppose more upon account of their majesties' favour, than any merit of my own.
Whenever I had a mind to see the town, it was always in my travelling-closet; which Glumdalclitch held in her lap in a kind of open sedan, after the fashion of the country, borne by four men, and attended by two others in the queen's livery.
I would not, therefore, on my account, have you encumber one moment of your precious time by sending for her to Edward Street, especially as every visit is so much deducted from the grand affair of education, which I really wish to have attended to while she remains at Miss Summers's.
This meeting was attended by large numbers of the best people of Boston, of both races.
Some of those who attended this meeting noticed that I seemed unusually tired, and some little time after the close of the meeting, one of the ladies who had been interested in it asked me in a casual way if I had ever been to Europe.
As he had been personally known to every man, woman and well-grown child in the village, the funeral, as the local newspaper phrased it, "was largely attended.
Such had been Silas Deemer--such the fixity and invariety of his life and habit, that the village humorist (who had once attended college) was moved to bestow upon him the sobriquet of "Old Ibidem," and, in the first issue of the local newspaper after the death, to explain without offence that Silas had taken "a day off.
I had hitherto attended the schools of Geneva, but my father thought it necessary for the completion of my education that I should be made acquainted with other customs than those of my native country.
A man would make but a very sorry chemist if he attended to that department of human knowledge alone.