attribution theory


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attribution theory

n
(Psychology) psychol the theory that tries to explain how people link actions and emotions to particular causes, both internal and external
References in periodicals archive ?
In social psychology, attribution theory proposes that to predict and control the environment, individuals tend to seek the causes of an event (Gilbert, 1998).
First, we detail the role of experiences in L2 motivation research in general and in attribution theory in particular.
Some important cognitive theories are Fritz Heider's attribution theory, Bandura's self-efficacy (in language teaching, the learners' linguistic self confidence) and Ryan and Deci's cognitive evaluation theory.
Kelley (1973) summarized and integrated the emerging research regarding attribution theory prompted by Heider's (1958) work and noted that attributions pertain to both social perception (i.e., causal statements made in an attempt to explain others' behavior) and self-perception (i.e., causal statements made in an attempt to explain one's own behavior).
The social psychological literature on attribution theory and cognitive biases is vast, and Smith defines 23 of the latter and their possible religious applications, including psychological placebo effects and their sociological analogue: If people define situations as real, they are real in their consequences.
Then she covers the more frequently used health behavior theories: self-efficacy theory, theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behavior, the health belief model, attribution theory, the trans-theoretical model: stages of change, protection motivation theory, social cognition theory, the diffusion of innovation, the social ecological model, social capital theory, and choosing a theory.
The second theory in the theoretical framework of this article is attribution theory, upon which Weiner (1985) expands upon Bandura's self-efficacy theory.
Attribution theory emerged in early years of twentieth century and soon became a hot pursuit of researchers.
internal/external) by utilizing attribution theory as a mediating mechanism for Peripheral and Embedded CSR which may lead to important organizational outcomes.
How the color of instructional feedback comes to influence interpersonal perceptions in achievement contexts may be explained by attribution theory, which accounts for the process by which people make causal explanations to observed stimuli (Heider, 1958).
Alan Palmer's most important methodological tool is attribution theory; he examines how narrators, characters, and readers attribute states of mind to characters and, where appropriate, also to themselves.