auburn


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Au·burn

 (ô′bərn)
A city of eastern Alabama west-northwest of Montgomery. It is the seat of Auburn University (founded 1856).

au·burn

 (ô′bərn)
n.
A moderate reddish brown to brown.

[Middle English, from Old French aborne, blond, from Latin alburnus, whitish, from albus, white; see albho- in Indo-European roots.]

au′burn adj.

auburn

(ˈɔːbən)
n
(Colours)
a. a moderate reddish-brown colour
b. (as adjective): auburn hair.
[C15 (originally meaning: blond): from Old French alborne blond, from Medieval Latin alburnus whitish, from Latin albus white]

au•burn

(ˈɔ bərn)

n.
1. a reddish brown or golden brown color.
adj.
2. of this color: auburn hair.
[1400–50; late Middle English abo(u)rne blond < Middle French, Old French auborne,alborne < Latin alburnus whitish]

Au•burn

(ˈɔ bərn)

n.

Auburn

An automobile made by the Auburn Automobile Company of Auburn, Indiana. The company was started by the Eckhart brothers and sold to E. L. Cord in 1924. Production was from 1900 to 1937.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.auburn - (of hair) colored a moderate reddish-brown; "auburn hair"
chromatic - being or having or characterized by hue

auburn

noun & adjective reddish-brown, tawny, russet, henna, rust-coloured, copper-coloured, chestnut-coloured, Titian red, nutbrown a tall woman with long auburn hair see shades of red
Translations
kaštanový
kastaniebrun
punaruskea
kestenjast
赤褐色の
적갈색의
kastanjebrun
สีน้ำตาลอมแดง
màu nâu hoe đỏ

auburn

[ˈɔːbən] ADJ [hair] → color castaño rojizo inv

auburn

[ˈɔːbərn] adjauburn inv, châtain roux inv

auburn

adj hairrotbraun, rostrot

auburn

[ˈɔːbən] adj (hair) → ramato/a, color rame inv

Auburn

كَسْتَنَائِيّ kaštanový kastaniebrun kastanienbraun πυρόξανθος castaño, castaño rojizo punaruskea auburn kestenjast castani chiari ramati 赤褐色の 적갈색의 kastanjebruin kastanjebrun kasztanowy castanho avermelhado, castanho-avermelhado красновато-коричневый kastanjebrun สีน้ำตาลอมแดง kumral màu nâu hoe đỏ 赤褐色
References in classic literature ?
For a part of the distance between Auburn and Newcastle the road-- first on one side of a creek and then on the other--occupies the whole bottom of the ravine, being partly cut out of the steep hillside, and partly built up with bowlders removed from the creek- bed by the miners.
It can't be denied your hair is terrible red; but I knew a girl once--went to school with her, in fact--whose hair was every mite as red as yours when she was young, but when she grew up it darkened to a real handsome auburn.
There is a figure we know well, just come out of the house, and shading her eyes with her hands as she looks for something in the distance, for the rays that fall on her white borderless cap and her pale auburn hair are very dazzling.
All were watching somebody in the garden with deep interest, their three faces close together: a jovial and round one, a pale one with dark hair, and a fair one whose tresses were auburn.
They said he was Sensible, well-informed, and Agreable; we did not pretend to Judge of such trifles, but as we were convinced he had no soul, that he had never read the sorrows of Werter, and that his Hair bore not the least resemblance to auburn, we were certain that Janetta could feel no affection for him, or at least that she ought to feel none.
From it issued as strange a sight as Carthoris ever had witnessed, though at the moment he had time to cast but a single fleeting glance at the tall bowmen emerging through the portal behind their long, oval shields; to note their flowing auburn hair; and to realize that the growling things at their side were fierce Barsoomian lions.
Nothing told me then that she, a few years hence, would be the wife of one entirely unknown to me as yet, but destined hereafter to become a closer friend than even herself, more intimate than that unmannerly lad of seventeen, by whom I was collared in the passage, on coming down, and well-nigh jerked off my equilibrium, and who, in correction for his impudence, received a resounding whack over the sconce, which, however, sustained no serious injury from the infliction; as, besides being more than commonly thick, it was protected by a redundant shock of short, reddish curls, that my mother called auburn.
The train, on leaving Sacramento, and passing the junction, Roclin, Auburn, and Colfax, entered the range of the Sierra Nevada.
This head with the auburn hair and hazel eyes is quite attractive.
It is well known that at her then somewhat advanced age, her long auburn hair, perfectly formed hands, and bright ruby lips, were still the admiration of all who saw her.
My father must have read the "Deserted Village" to us, and told us something of the author's pathetic life, for I cannot remember when I first knew of "sweet Auburn," or had the light of the poet's own troubled day upon the "loveliest village of the plain.
Also, its color was unusual in that it was almost auburn.