audible

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au·di·ble

 (ô′də-bəl)
adj.
That is heard or that can be heard.
n.
Football An offensive play or defensive formation called at the line of scrimmage just before the snap, usually as an adjustment to the opposing team's formation. Also called automatic.
v. aud·i·bled, aud·i·bling, aud·i·bles Football
v.tr.
To call (an audible) at the line of scrimmage.
v.intr.
To call an audible.

[Late Latin audībilis, from Latin audīre, to hear; see au- in Indo-European roots.]

au′di·bil′i·ty, au′di·ble·ness n.
au′di·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

audible

(ˈɔːdɪbəl)
adj
(Physiology) perceptible to the hearing; loud enough to be heard
n
(American Football) American football a change of playing tactics called by the quarterback when the offense is lined up at the line of scrimmage
[C16: from Late Latin audibilis, from Latin audīre to hear]
ˌaudiˈbility, ˈaudibleness n
ˈaudibly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

au•di•ble

(ˈɔ də bəl)

adj.
1. capable of being heard; loud enough to be heard; actually heard.
n.
2. (in football) a change in play called out orally after both teams have assumed their positions at the line of scrimmage.
[1520–30; < Late Latin audībilis= Latin audī(re) to hear + -bilis -ble]
au`di•bil′i•ty, au′di•ble•ness, n.
au′di•bly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.audible - a football play is changed orally after both teams have assumed their positions at the line of scrimmage
football play - (American football) a play by the offensive team
Adj.1.audible - heard or perceptible by the earaudible - heard or perceptible by the ear; "he spoke in an audible whisper"
loud - characterized by or producing sound of great volume or intensity; "a group of loud children"; "loud thunder"; "her voice was too loud"; "loud trombones"
perceptible - capable of being perceived by the mind or senses; "a perceptible limp"; "easily perceptible sounds"; "perceptible changes in behavior"
inaudible, unhearable - impossible to hear; imperceptible by the ear; "an inaudible conversation"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

audible

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مَسْموع، مُمُكِن سَماعُه
slyšitelný
hørbarhørlig
hallható
heyranlegur
girdimasgirdimumas
dzirdams
počuteľný
duyulabilirişitilebilir

audible

[ˈɔːdɪbl] ADJaudible
his voice was scarcely audibleapenas se podía oír su voz, su voz era apenas perceptible
there was an audible gaspse oyó un grito ahogado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

audible

[ˈɔːdɪbəl] adjaudible
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

audible

adjhörbar, (deutlich) vernehmbar; she was hardly audibleman konnte sie kaum hören
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

audible

[ˈɔːdɪbl] adjudibile, percettibile
there was audible laughter → si è chiaramente sentita una risata
he was hardly audible → si riusciva a malapena a sentirlo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

audible

(ˈoːdebl) adjective
able to be heard. When the microphone broke her voice was barely audible.
ˌaudiˈbility noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its Talking Bus campaign is calling for audable announcements to be made of the current stop, next stop and final destination to enable blind and partially sighted people to use buses with confidence.
Rather, Lincoln pointed out that God and the Bible were not proper tools for resolving the slavery controversy: "the Almighty gives no audable answer to the question, and his revelation--the Bible--gives none--or, at most, none but such as admits of a squabble, as to it's meaning." Lincoln refuted Ross by exposing his self-interested motives: "If [Ross] decides that God Wills [his slave] Sambo to continue a slave, he thereby retains his own comfortable position." Lincoln asked whether, under these circumstances, Ross will be "actuated by that perfect impartiality, which has ever been considered most favorable to correct decisions?" Neither God nor the Bible was needed to refute Ross.