audiogram


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Related to audiogram: pure tone audiogram

au·di·o·gram

 (ô′dē-ə-grăm′)
n.
1. A graphic record of hearing ability for various sound frequencies that is used to measure hearing loss.
2. The procedure performed to produce such a record.

audiogram

(ˈɔːdɪəʊˌɡræm)
n
a graphic record of the acuity of hearing of a person obtained by means of an audiometer

au•di•o•gram

(ˈɔ di əˌgræm)

n.
the graphic record produced by an audiometer.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.audiogram - a graphical representation of a person's auditory sensitivity to sound
representation - a creation that is a visual or tangible rendering of someone or something
Translations

au·di·o·gram

n. audiograma, instrumento para anotar la agudeza de la audición.

audiogram

n audiograma m
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References in periodicals archive ?
The acoustic threshold measured 1 hour after acoustic trauma was elevated in the control group to 70-90 dB in the higher frequencies of the compound action potential audiogram, with a maximum threshold elevation ranging between 12 and 16 kHz.
Some of the hearing tests may include a tuning fork, pure tone audiogram, and bone conduction hearing or a speech audiogram.
You give a signal at the moment when you detect each sound, the results are recorded on a graph called an audiogram.
The most common audiometric configuration was the notched audiogram with a dip at 4 kHz occurring in 14 patients followed by slope configuration found in 13 patients.
An audiogram - con - firmed hearing decrement occurred in 142 of the participants receiving azi - thromycin (25%), compared with 110 of those receiving placebo (20%) (P -.04).
In an audiology clinic, the universally accepted first measure of hearing ability is the audiogram. This is a measure of pure-tone hearing loss (against an agreed upon standard) over a wide range of frequencies.
Intended as a supplemental text for residency training programs, this collection describes the technical aspects of hearing aid fitting and addresses areas that can be particularly challenging to new physicians, such as fitting the pediatric patient with hearing loss or the patient with hydropic hearing loss with a changing baseline audiogram. One lengthy chapter reviews scientific evidence on potential nutriceutical interventions to protect hearing health.
Known as an audiogram, this grid of responses covers a wide range of frequencies from 250 Hz to 4000 Hz (low to high), and intensity of sounds from 0 dB to 120 dB (soft to loud).
An audiogram showed bilateral symmetrical mixed hearing loss.
A hearing test (audiogram) is easy, quick, and painless.
Pre- and postconcert audiograms were compared, and the data were analyzed using a multinomial probability model to determine audiogram frequency test-retest variability.