aurality

aurality

(ɔːˌrælɪtɪ)
n
the quality, condition, or degree of being aural
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike the language governmentality approach used to 'tame' the Chinese, the British completely reinvented and standardised the Malay language by 'the socioeconomic shift from manuscript to print, the cultural transition from orality and aurality to writing, and the orthographic transition from Arabic to romanized script' (p.
Why does sound hold the promise of "resistant aurality" in African American experimental literature in particular?
11) to shut when they do not wish to hear, aurality and sonicity in healthcare and clinical settings deserves our attention because it is a mainstay and influential communicative element.
The movement of air, the breath of meaning: Aurality in multimodal composition.
As Jennifer Esmail suggests in her work on "deaf poetry," within a poetic culture "that invested poetry with a special relationship to aurality and orality" such as the Victorian, a poet's representation of sound might be expected to have an argumentative aspect, to answer the dominant culture in some way.
"Aurality in Print: Revisiting Roger Williams's A Key into the Language of America." PMLA 13, no.
The speed with which these sounds are introduced, and the short clauses that contain them, create a poetic cacophony that recalls the chaotic aurality of a Lakeland village on a festive day.
writings for Zhang Jian (744-804), and the mastering voice: text and aurality in the ninth-century mediascape.
She shows how vocal production is in fact "shaped by unconscious and conscious training practices that function as repositories for cultural attitudes toward gender, class, race, and sexuality." Both adult criticism and the girls' own talk about voice thus converge on the same question, posed succinctly by cultural anthropologist Amanda Weidman: "What forms of subjectivity, identity, and public and political life are enabled, and silenced, by particular regimes of aurality and the voice?" (38).
Of course, any single archive holds the potential of infinite histories, as Jairo Moreno observes in "Imperial Aurality: Jazz, the Archive, and U.S.
Through two impressive case studies he illustrates the differing ways in which aurality was of importance for bird naming, without trivializing the influence of visual means.