aurochs


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au·rochs

 (ou′rŏks′, ôr′ŏks′)
n. pl. aurochs
1. A wild ox (Bos primigenius) of Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia that became extinct in the 17th century and is believed to be the ancestor of domestic cattle. Also called urus.
2. See wisent.

[Obsolete German, variant of German Auerochs, from Middle High German ūrohse, from Old High German ūrohso : ūro, aurochs + ohso, ox; see uks-en- in Indo-European roots.]

aurochs

(ˈɔːrɒks)
n, pl -rochs
1. (Animals) a recently extinct member of the cattle tribe, Bos primigenius, that inhabited forests in N Africa, Europe, and SW Asia. It had long horns and is thought to be one of the ancestors of modern cattle. Also called: urus
2. (Palaeontology) a recently extinct member of the cattle tribe, Bos primigenius, that inhabited forests in N Africa, Europe, and SW Asia. It had long horns and is thought to be one of the ancestors of modern cattle. Also called: urus
[C18: from German, from Old High German ūrohso, from ūro bison + ohso ox]

au•rochs

(ˈɔr ɒks)

n., pl. -rochs.
1. a large, extinct European wild ox, Bos primigenius.
2. bison. (def. 2).
[1760–70; < German, variant (now obsolete) of Auerochs, Old High German ūrohso=ūr (c. Old English ūr bison) + ohso ox]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aurochs - European bison having a smaller and higher head than the North American bisonaurochs - European bison having a smaller and higher head than the North American bison
genus Bison - sometimes considered a subgenus of genus Bos: American buffalo
bison - any of several large humped bovids having shaggy manes and large heads and short horns
2.aurochs - large recently extinct long-horned European wild oxaurochs - large recently extinct long-horned European wild ox; considered one of the ancestors of domestic cattle
Bos, genus Bos - wild and domestic cattle; in some classifications placed in the subfamily Bovinae or tribe Bovini
wild ox, ox - any of various wild bovines especially of the genera Bos or closely related Bibos
Translations

aurochs

[ˈɔːrɒks] Nuro m, aurochs m

aurochs

nAuerochse m, → Ur m
References in classic literature ?
Here they fed me, releasing my arms, and I ate of half-cooked aurochs steak and a stew which may have been made of snakes, for many of the long, round pieces of meat suggested them most nauseatingly.
There were aurochs, red deer, saber-tooth tiger, cave-bear, hyaenadon and many other examples of the fauna of Caspak done in colors, usually of four shades of brown, or scratched upon the surface of the rock.
It was a beautiful, gently rolling country, broken by occasional outcroppings of sandstone and by patches of dense forest relieved by open, park-like stretches and broad meadows whereon grazed countless herbivorous animals--red deer, aurochs, and infinite variety of antelope and at least three distinct species of horse, the latter ranging in size from a creature about as large as Nobs to a magnificent animal fourteen to sixteen hands high.
The same site revealed spreads of flints along with large pits dating between 10,000 BC to 4,100 BC that could have been used by hunter-gatherers to trap deer, elks or aurochs (an ancestor of modern bison).
Borrowing its name from the mighty Aurochs, a large wild ancestor of the Spanish fighting bull, the Urus takes on the look and feel of the raging bull as depicted famously in Lamborghini's logo.
EXPERIMENT: The Sayaguesa from Spain (right) and Chianina from Italy (left) are two of the breeds being used in a German project to recreate the aurochs.
In October 2017, a couple of Dagestan aurochs, eared and royal pheasants, a carpet python were brought from Moscow.
The Urus, also known as Aurochs, is one of the large, wild ancestors of domestic cattle.
Food at Stonehenge exhibition include the skull of an aurochs, an extinct species of wild cattle with huge horns and a rare complete Bronze cauldron dating from 700BC, which would have formed a centrepiece of feasts.
The stencils of horses, mammoths, lions, bears, bison, aurochs.
The remains of game hunting at the site include the whole range of ungulates characteristic of the period: elk (Alces alces), aurochs (Bos primigenius), red deer (Cervus elaphus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and wild boar (Sus scrofa).
Others point to an extinct wild ox from Eurasia, the Aurochs, or of a wild goat.