aurora borealis


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aurora bo·re·al·is

 (bôr′ē-ăl′ĭs)
n. pl. aurora bo·re·al·is·es (-ĭ-sĭz) or aurorae borealis
An aurora that occurs in northern regions of the earth. Also called northern lights.

[New Latin aurōra boreālis : Latin aurōra, dawn + Latin boreālis, northern.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aurora borealis

(ˌbɔːrɪˈeɪlɪs)
n
(Physical Geography) (sometimes capital) the aurora seen around the North Pole. Also called: northern lights
[C17: New Latin: northern aurora]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

auro′ra bo•re•al′is

(ˌbɔr iˈæl ɪs, -ˈeɪ lɪs, ˌboʊr-)
n.
the aurora of the Northern Hemisphere. Also called northern lights, auro′ra polar′is.
[1621; < New Latin: northern aurora; see boreal]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

aurora bo·re·al·is

(bôr′ē-ăl′ĭs)
An aurora that occurs in northern regions of the Earth. Also called northern lights.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aurora borealis - the aurora of the northern hemisphereaurora borealis - the aurora of the northern hemisphere
aurora - an atmospheric phenomenon consisting of bands of light caused by charged solar particles following the earth's magnetic lines of force
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

aurora borealis

[ɔːˈrɔːrəbɔːrɪˈeɪlɪs] Naurora f boreal
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

aurora borealis

n (Astron) → nördliches Polarlicht, Nordlicht nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

aurora borealis

[ɔːˈrɔːrəbɔːrɪˈeɪlɪs] naurora boreale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Any overheated motor may of course "seize" without warning; but so many complaints have reached us of accidents similar to yours while shooting the Aurora that we are inclined to believe with Lavalle that the upper strata of the Aurora Borealis are practically one big electric "leak," and that the paralysis of your engines was due to complete magnetization of all metallic parts.
Towards midnight the sea suddenly resumed its usual colour; but behind us, even to the limits of the horizon, the sky reflected the whitened waves, and for a long time seemed impregnated with the vague glimmerings of an aurora borealis.
The stars leaped and danced in the frosty air, and overhead the colored bars of the aurora borealis were shooting like great searchlights.
It was the aurora borealis of the frozen pole exiled to a summer land!
Under more elevated latitudes, it might have been mistaken for an immense aurora borealis, for the sky appeared on fire.
The mammoth grand-stand was clothed in flags, streamers, and rich tapestries, and packed with several acres of small-fry tributary kings, their suites, and the British aristocracy; with our own royal gang in the chief place, and each and every individual a flashing prism of gaudy silks and velvets -- well, I never saw anything to begin with it but a fight between an Upper Mississippi sunset and the aurora borealis. The huge camp of beflagged and gay- colored tents at one end of the lists, with a stiff- standing sentinel at every door and a shining shield hanging by him for challenge, was another fine sight.
Such meteorous appearances are to be explained in this way--that they are the reflections of the Aurora Borealis, and it is highly probable they are caused principally by electricity."
I tell ye that when they got here they'd be jommlin' and jostlin' one another that way that it `ud be like a fight up on the ice in the old days, when we'd be at one another from daylight to dark, an' tryin' to tie up our cuts by the aurora borealis." This was evidently local pleasantry, for the old man cackled over it, and his cronies joined in with gusto.
"To a man of philosophic temperament like myself the blood-tick, with its lancet-like proboscis and its distending stomach, is as beautiful a work of Nature as the peacock or, for that matter, the aurora borealis. It pains me to hear you speak of it in so unappreciative a fashion.
"They are like the Aurora Borealis," said the King, who always answered questions that were addressed to other people, "only much more natural.
With the aurora borealis flaming coldly overhead, or the stars leaping in the frost dance, and the land numb and frozen under its pall of snow, this song of the huskies might have been the defiance of life, only it was pitched in minor key, with long- drawn wailings and half-sobs, and was more the pleading of life, the articulate travail of existence.
Kadlu, being a good hunter, was rich in iron harpoons, snow- knives, bird-darts, and all the other things that make life easy up there in the great cold; and he was the head of his tribe, or, as they say, "the man who knows all about it by practice." This did not give him any authority, except now and then he could advise his friends to change their hunting-grounds; but Kotuko used it to domineer a little, in the lazy, fat Inuit fashion, over the other boys, when they came out at night to play ball in the moonlight, or to sing the Child's Song to the Aurora Borealis.