autarchy


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au·tar·chy 1

 (ô′tär′kē)
n. pl. au·tar·chies
1. Absolute rule or power; autocracy.
2. A country under such rule.

[From Greek autarkhos, self-governing, autarch : auto-, auto- + arkhos, ruler (from arkhein, to rule).]

au·tar′chic (-kĭk), au·tar′chi·cal (-kĭ-kəl) adj.

au·tar·chy 2

 (ô′tär′kē)
n.
Variant of autarky.

autarchy

(ˈɔːtɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) unlimited rule; autocracy
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) self-government; self-rule
[C17: from Greek autarkhia, from autarkhos autocratic; see auto-, -archy]
auˈtarchic, auˈtarchical adj

autarchy

(ˈɔːtɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a variant spelling (now rare) of autarky

au•tar•chy

(ˈɔ tɑr ki)

n., pl. -chies.
1. absolute sovereignty.
2. an autocratic government.
[1655–65; < Greek autarchía self-rule. See aut-, -archy]
au•tar′chic, au•tar′chi•cal, adj.
au′tar•chist, n.

autarchy

1. an absolute sovereignty.
2. an autocratic government.
3. autarky. — autarch, n.autarchie, autarchical, adj.
See also: Government

autarchy

A form of government in which one person has absolute and unlimited power.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.autarchy - economic independence as a national policy
independence, independency - freedom from control or influence of another or others
2.autarchy - a political system governed by a single individualautarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
monarchy - an autocracy governed by a monarch who usually inherits the authority
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power
dictatorship, monocracy, one-man rule, shogunate, Stalinism, totalitarianism, tyranny, authoritarianism, Caesarism, despotism, absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)

autarchy

noun
A government in which a single leader or party exercises absolute control over all citizens and every aspect of their lives:
Translations

autarchy

[ˈɔːtɑːkɪ] Nautarquía f

autarchy

n
Selbstregierung f
References in periodicals archive ?
"I believe it is a dangerous anachronism, it is autarchy, to say that we will abolish the asylum law, it is like saying we will abolish a large part of democracy," he told Reuters.
Another example of this goal was the Memorandum of Understanding signed on May 6 between the Portuguese Foreign Affairs Department (through the Portuguese State Secretary of the Portuguese Communities, Jose Lus Carneiro) and the Toronto City Council ( through the vice president of the Canadian autarchy).
AUTARCHY A Self-sufficiency B Absolute power C Bringing into being who am I?
This does not mean, necessarily, that textual autarchy is present in both cultures, since in this case one would be talking about drama and not post-drama.
State power, autarchy and political conquest in Nigerian federalism.
(8) In the same year the Plan de Estabilizacion y Liberizacion ["Stabilization Plan"] was approved, which heralded the end of autarchy and an opening up in terms of politics and economics (Gubern 1981).
Political competition eliminates the autarchy and builds a democratic atmosphere.
3) Desire for care versus autarchy. 4) Conflicts of self-value.
With the initial awakening of the characteristics of the practical public manager, this research was developed in a federal autarchy, to the occupants of a commissioned function of executive manager and customer service manager.
'Achievement of autarchy is difficult, but not impossible.
As a major economy hoping to enter on a trajectory of fast economic growth, India needs to develop deep international links and supply chains, most immediately in its neighborhood, but the Belt and Road may well force it into new forms of economic isolation, this time involuntary, as opposed to the years of Indian economic autarchy. New Delhi may even see in the Belt and Road a form of rewriting history by rebuilding trade and economic links between Europe and Asia while ignoring the Indian subcontinent, historically the meeting point for such trade and cultural networks.