auteur theory


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auteur theory

n.
Belief in the primary creative importance of the director in filmmaking, often combined with a critical advocacy of the works of certain strong, distinctive directors whose films have a consistent theme or style. Also called auteurism.

auteur′ the`ory


n.
the theory that the director is the chief creator of a film and thereby gives it a distinctive individual style.
[1960–65]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In his article on 'Positioning auteur theory in Chinese cinemas studies' (2007), Song Hwee Lim argued that it was necessary to explore 'the relevance of auteur theory to the study of Chinese cinemas' as well as the its relation to 'the auteurist approach institutionalized within Anglophone academia' (Lim, 2007: 224).
Most arguments against auteur theory are based on the simple idea that it posits the director as the author of a movie, says Morrison, a claim assailed by critics as denying the collaborative nature of cinema and maintaining a romanticized vision of individual genius around the director's role.
Some discussion of auteur theory would have helped here, giving Decker a chance to explain why he takes this hotly debated method of readership at face value.
Motivated by the fact that these films should be studied in terms of indigenous codes and inner dynamics using auteur theory, this paper is a critical reading of authorship in Nigerian cinema using Tunde Kelanis Saworoide (1999) and Maami (2011), and Kunle Afolayan's The Figurine (2009) and Phone Swap (2012) as case studies.
Since the 1960s and the emergence of Auteur Theory in film studies, the recognition of film directors has found a new direction.
Ilka Brombach's 2014 monograph offers a new reading of German auteur cinema by breaking with auteur theory and alternatively embracing Rancierean aesthetics.
Far better, they say, is what American academic Walter Mead has called the "auteur theory of foreign policy"--a foreign policy guided by a brilliant strategist, insulated from the unruly masses.
In France this was due to the preferential prejudices of those critics (who favored Rossellini over Fellini), and in the United States because of Fellini's undermining of the auteur theory as formulated by Andrew Sarris.
Influential film critic for "Cahiers du Cinema", mastermind of the "auteur theory" and heir to the humanistic cinematic tradition of Jean Renoir, Truffaut's gift to the world were tender love stories, exciting crime films and brilliant literary adaptations.
After an introduction that offers a succinct summary of all the main sections comprised in this book, Burnett starts with "Auteurs" whose central purpose is to explore Shakespeare and world cinema from the perspective of auteur theory. Chapter one sheds light upon Alexander Abela's adaptations of Shakespeare, such as Makibefo (1999), a Malagasy-language production based on Macbeth and Souli (2002), a Malagasy-and French-language production based on Othello.
Exploring this assertion further requires more attention to authorial agency while of course not reverting to the Romanticisms of Andrew Sarris's auteur theory. Janet Staiger productively draws upon Judith Butler's notion of "performative statements" in order to find a place for authorial agency after the wake of post-structuralism.