authoress


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authoress

(ˈɔːθəˌrɛs)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) old-fashioned or derogatory a female author
Usage: The gender-neutral form of authoress is author
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

au•thor•ess

(ˈɔ θər ɪs)

n.
a woman who is an author.
[1485–95]
usage: See -ess.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.authoress - a woman authorauthoress - a woman author      
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

authoress

[ˈɔːθərɪs] Nautora f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

authoress

[ˈɔːθərɛs] n (old-fashioned)femme f écrivain, écrivaine f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

authoress

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

authoress

[ˈɔːθərɪs] nautrice f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
[Greek] The authoress has bungled by borrowing these words verbatim from the "Iliad", without prefixing the necessary "do not," which I have supplied.
I do not think the authoress thought all this out, but attribute the strangeness of the coincidence to unconscious cerebration and saturation.
ADVERTISEMENT BY THE AUTHORESS, TO NORTHANGER ABBEY
Blake's interference has placed her as an authoress, seems due on the ground of common justice.
But are you fancying she's an authoress?--not a bit of it.
"Hurrah for Miss March, the celebrated American authoress!" cried Laurie, throwing up his hat and catching it again, to the great delight of two ducks, four cats, five hens, and half a dozen Irish children, for they were out of the city now.
Won't it be fun to see them in print, and shan't we feel proud of our authoress?"
He introduced Miss Briggs to the lady with whom he happened to be walking, the Lady Jane Sheepshanks, saying, "Lady Jane, permit me to introduce to you my aunt's kindest friend and most affectionate companion, Miss Briggs, whom you know under another title, as authoress of the delightful 'Lyrics of the Heart,' of which you are so fond." Lady Jane blushed too as she held out a kind little hand to Miss Briggs, and said something very civil and incoherent about mamma, and proposing to call on Miss Crawley, and being glad to be made known to the friends and relatives of Mr.
Snodgrass--to the authoress of "The Expiring Frog."' Very few people but those who have tried it, know what a difficult process it is to bow in green velvet smalls, and a tight jacket, and high-crowned hat; or in blue satin trunks and white silks, or knee-cords and top-boots that were never made for the wearer, and have been fixed upon him without the remotest reference to the comparative dimensions of himself and the suit.
This is what it says: "The Piccadilly Theatre will reopen shortly with a dramatized version of Miss Edith Butler's popular novel, White Roses , prepared by the authoress herself.
"Why, it Is Kate King, the authoress. Bless me, how rude not to introduce you!
The most permanent results of the latter part of the century in fiction were attained by three women who introduced and successively continued the novel which depicts, from the woman's point of view, with delicate satire, and at first in the hope of accomplishing some reform, or at least of showing the beauty of virtue and morality, the contemporary manners of well-to-do 'society.' The first of these authoresses was Miss Frances Burney, who later became Madame D'Arblay, but is generally referred to familiarly as Fanny Burney.