authorial


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au·thor

 (ô′thər)
n.
1.
a. The writer of a book, article, or other text.
b. One who practices writing as a profession.
2. One who writes or constructs an electronic document or system, such as a website.
3. An originator or creator, as of a theory or plan.
4. Author God.
tr.v. au·thored, au·thor·ing, au·thors
1. Usage Problem To write or be the author of (a published text).
2. To write or construct (an electronic document or system): authored the company's website.

[Alteration (influenced by authentic, authoritative, and other technical terms of Greek origin spelled with th) of Middle English auctour, autor, from Old French auctur, autor, from Latin auctor, creator, from auctus, past participle of augēre, to create; see aug- in Indo-European roots.]

au·thor′i·al (ô-thôr′ē-əl, ô-thŏr′-) adj.
Usage Note: The verb author has been criticized for its transitive use as an unnecessary or pretentious synonym of write, though note that it typically refers to the writing of material that has been published—and not to unpublished texts such as love letters or diaries. So the two words are not exact synonyms. The Usage Panel has tended to sympathize with the traditional view, but this sympathy has been slowly eroding over the decades. In 1964, 81 percent of the Panel found the verb unacceptable in writing. In our 1988 survey, 74 percent rejected it in the sentence He has authored a dozen books on the subject. In 2001, the proportion of Panelists who rejected this same sentence fell to 60 percent. · Journalists frequently use the verb author to apply to the creation or sponsoring of legislative acts, as in The senator authored a bill limiting uses of desert lands in California. In these cases the lawmaker may not have actually written the bill that bears his or her name but rather promoted its idea and passage. While the Panelists were a bit more tolerant of this legislative usage, the nays still have the slightest edge, with 51 percent rejecting the previously quoted sentence in 2001, down from 64 percent in 1988. This suggests that the verb will eventually be accepted by most people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.authorial - of or by or typical of an authorauthorial - of or by or typical of an author; "authorial comments"; "auctorial flights of imagination"
Translations

authorial

[ɔːˈθɔːrɪəl] ADJdel autor

authorial

[ɔːˈθɔːriəl] adj [control, voice, intention, intervention] → de l'auteur(e)

authorial

adj (liter)eines/des Autors
References in classic literature ?
This authoritative text is reprinted from the Library of America edition of Novels by Edith Wharton, and is based on the sixth impression of the first edition, which incorporates the last set of extensive revisions that are obviously authorial.
Voluntary ex ante transparency notice: Maintenance and authorial service care of the centaur and nbp-heart software
It is the first to tackle the crucial question of how Pasolini crafted and shaped the complex body of his work in poetry, film, art and politics, together with the powerful myth of his authorial persona.
The collection spans a wide range of subjects and subjectivities, tangling and twisting together an inherited and feminist-influenced refusal to pretend at authorial distance, or objectivity.
Korthals Altes also shows how readers attribute an ethos to personalized narrators (as in Stanzel's first-person and the authorial narrative situation) or to less personalized narration (as in the figural narrative situation or cases of camera-eye narration) or how they equate the narrator or narration with the author.
two types of people in the world; those who like authorial intrusions,
Piglia, however, also innovates with postmodern aspects, such as an authorial alter-ego character, lengthy footnotes, and absurd moments.
Essays include: voice, signature, mask: the Byzantine author; the ethics of authorship: some tensions in the 11th century; the poems of the late Gregory the Monk; authorial voice and self-presentation in a 9th-century hymn on the prodigal son; aristocracy and literary production in the 10th century; authorial identity and authorial intention in Michael ChoniatesAEs work; anonymity, dispossession and reappropriation in the Prolog of Nikephoros Basilakes; authorship and gender (and) identity: womenAEs writing in the Middle Byzantine; the authorial voice of Anna Komnene.
Paraschas examines this idea of "sympathetic imagination," including the element of irony and the authorial economy of sympathy, and then lists and analyzes authorial doubles in realistic fiction, including Balzac (the author as capitalist), Baudelaire (the author as prostitute) and Eliot (the author as commodity and its soul).
This is allied to an argument that the changes that result from this transmission can be seen as a movement towards a set of patterns common in orally transmitted texts such as ballads and folk tales, rather than simply as degradation from an authorial original.
Allegedly, it was very serious and a bit unrealistic and apart from for this, the authorial teams in Skopje and Brussels made some mistakes in the facts and wrote some lies too.
When Anna Mary converted to spiritualism with her husband, she developed differing understandings of the feminine authorial project, even though Mary had nurtured Anna Mary's authorial and artistic vision from her childhood.