authorial

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au·thor

 (ô′thər)
n.
1.
a. The writer of a book, article, or other text.
b. One who practices writing as a profession.
2. One who writes or constructs an electronic document or system, such as a website.
3. An originator or creator, as of a theory or plan.
4. Author God.
tr.v. au·thored, au·thor·ing, au·thors
1. Usage Problem To write or be the author of (a published text).
2. To write or construct (an electronic document or system): authored the company's website.

[Alteration (influenced by authentic, authoritative, and other technical terms of Greek origin spelled with th) of Middle English auctour, autor, from Old French auctur, autor, from Latin auctor, creator, from auctus, past participle of augēre, to create; see aug- in Indo-European roots.]

au·thor′i·al (ô-thôr′ē-əl, ô-thŏr′-) adj.
Usage Note: The verb author has been criticized for its transitive use as an unnecessary or pretentious synonym of write, though note that it typically refers to the writing of material that has been published—and not to unpublished texts such as love letters or diaries. So the two words are not exact synonyms. The Usage Panel has tended to sympathize with the traditional view, but this sympathy has been slowly eroding over the decades. In 1964, 81 percent of the Panel found the verb unacceptable in writing. In our 1988 survey, 74 percent rejected it in the sentence He has authored a dozen books on the subject. In 2001, the proportion of Panelists who rejected this same sentence fell to 60 percent. · Journalists frequently use the verb author to apply to the creation or sponsoring of legislative acts, as in The senator authored a bill limiting uses of desert lands in California. In these cases the lawmaker may not have actually written the bill that bears his or her name but rather promoted its idea and passage. While the Panelists were a bit more tolerant of this legislative usage, the nays still have the slightest edge, with 51 percent rejecting the previously quoted sentence in 2001, down from 64 percent in 1988. This suggests that the verb will eventually be accepted by most people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.authorial - of or by or typical of an authorauthorial - of or by or typical of an author; "authorial comments"; "auctorial flights of imagination"
Translations

authorial

[ɔːˈθɔːrɪəl] ADJdel autor

authorial

[ɔːˈθɔːriəl] adj [control, voice, intention, intervention] → de l'auteur(e)

authorial

adj (liter)eines/des Autors
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the overt and authorially signposted mode of reading the criminal child is that "[his] crimes arise from lack of education.
His next endeavor in his chosen genre to follow Invisible Man would take him over or, more aptly, take him under authorially.
For most critics, the adoption is a successful and authorially endorsed attempt to imitate the resigned charity of the humble village priest and doctor.
others first appeared in a key (or keys) different from surviving manuscripts, while for songs whose manuscripts are lost it is sometimes impossible to identify an original key from the printed sources, let alone any authorially preferred one.
For some not very new (Tillyard's Elizabethan World Picture plus Theory), for others not very historical (the anecdote--"the touch of the real"--puffed up to the level of cultural norm), New Historicism also goes by the name of "cultural poetics," a stance towards literature which considers that the text is culturally produced and authorially created in equal measure and exists in a symbiotic relationship of mutual shaping with history or ideology (see Gallagher and Greenblatt 2000).
They remain silent, their own voices rendered authorially and narratively silenced, as is true in the case of the vast majority of rape victims.
Abstract entities cannot enter into causal processes, so fictional characters cannot be authorially created.
According to Eshelman (2008: 1), all of the performatist works "derive their strength from the authorially guided apotheosis of reduced, whole subjects and from the performative use of object-bound, holistic signs".
Petersen concludes from the absence of any strong clustering of orally transmitted texts as against authorially transmitted ones that the latter share the unreliability attributed to the former (216-17).
We examine the monologue as a speech act and the poem as an authorially crafted piece.
Building on Susan Felch's analysis of 'scriptural collage' and Margaret Ezell's theories of 'social authorship', Burke's essay presents new archival materials for the study of early modern women's religious compilation, and articulates ways in which these compilations might be understood authorially, as 'the necessary act of recompense' each writer owes to God.
We can, however, define the parameters of the authorially invested culture, at least in this instance, with more precision and describe a framework of domestic individualism reflected in the demand of certain kinds of readers for texts that indulged their desire to be unlike others, in a world--symbolized by the advent of a proto-"mass" public (experienced, of course, in relative terms)--figured to be materialistic, vulgar in its tastes, and morally bankrupt.