autism

(redirected from autistics)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to autistics: autism

au·tism

 (ô′tĭz′əm)
n.
Autism spectrum disorder, especially a more severe form of the disorder characterized by significant impairments in social interaction and communication, highly repetitive behavior, and strong resistance to change.

au′tist n.
au·tis′tic (-tĭk) adj. & n.
au·tis′ti·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

autism

(ˈɔːtɪzəm)
n
(Psychiatry) psychiatry a developmental disorder whose symptoms include difficulty in responding conventionally to people and actions and limited use of communication
[C20: from Greek autos self + -ism]
auˈtistic adj, n
Usage: Rather than talking about an autistic or autistics, it is better to use phrases such as a person with autism and people with autism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

au•tism

(ˈɔ tɪz əm)

n.
a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by impaired communication, extreme self-absorption, and detachment from reality.
[1910–15; < Greek aut(ós) self + -ism]
au′tist, n.
au•tis′tic, adj.
au•tis′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

au·tism

(ô′tĭz′əm)
A disorder of development in which a person's ability to interact with others is severely limited. People with autism often have abnormal behavior patterns, such as the repetition of specific movements or a tendency to focus on certain objects.

autistic adjective
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

autism

1. a tendency to daydream.
2. Psychiatry. an extreme withdrawal into fantasy in thought or behavior, not correctible by external information. — autistic, adj.
See also: Dreams
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

autism

Children suffering from this condition appear withdrawn, as if lost in fantasy. No cause or cure has yet been found; but specialized teaching has enabled many to lead relatively normal lives.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.autism - (psychiatry) an abnormal absorption with the selfautism - (psychiatry) an abnormal absorption with the self; marked by communication disorders and short attention span and inability to treat others as people
infantile autism - a rare but serious syndrome of childhood characterized by withdrawal and lack of social responsiveness or interest in others and serious linguistic deficits; "there is considerable dispute among specialists concerning infantile autism"
psychiatry, psychological medicine, psychopathology - the branch of medicine dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
autismus
autisme
autism
autismi
autizam
autizmus
autismo
自閉症
자폐증
autismus
autisme
autyzm
autism
autizamаутизам
otizm

autism

[ˈɔːtɪzəm] Nautismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

autism

[ˈɔːtɪzəm] nautisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

autism

nAutismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

autism

[ˈɔːtɪzm] nautismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

au·tism

n. autismo, trastorno de la conducta que se manifiesta en un egocentrismo extremo;
infantile ______ infantil.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

autism

n autismo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"When you ask autistic people about these behaviours, their answers shed new light on the range of desire autistics have for social connection, and they express frustration that their behaviour is misinterpreted.
We're surrounded by autistics, and yet we remain painfully unaware of what it means to be autistic.
Offering a synthesis of science and wisdom, Bogdashina presents some of the key insights and issues into how autistics experience the world and spirituality.
Autistics thus succeed only on self-explanatory tasks, such as the Raven's test.
The research team from Universite de Montreal and Harvard University has found that autistics are up to 40 percent faster at solving complex problems.
Fenfluramine, another drug that alters serotonin supplies, has yielded mixed results with autistics. Clinicians often prescribe the antipsychotic drug haloperidol for autism, but its purported effectiveness and sometimes severe side effects have proved controversial.
In the December AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, the scientists report finding that 26 of the autistics had been diagnosed early in life with one of 12 rare diseases.
Contrasting reactions exemplify the sometimes triumphant, sometimes disillusioning outcomes of programs such as Strain's, which specialize in "behavioral treatment" -- perhaps better known as behavior modification -- for autistics. Teachers use praise, rewards and other nonpunitive tactics to promote appropriate behaviors in the classroom, and parents use behavioral techniques at home with children as young as 3 years old.
Some of the findings stem from a 10-year effort to obtain the brains of deceased autistics, conducted jointly by scientists at the University of California at Los Angeles and autism researchers affiliated with the National Society for Children and Adults With Autism in Washington, D.C.
Researchers at the Massachusetts Mental Health Center in Boston now report that a small group of adult autistics have shown moderate to marked drops in similar behavior, such as head-banging and unprovoked attacks on others, thanks to betablocker treatment.
Autistics spent as much time with the puzzle and cleanup chores as did the other children, but spent less time playing with dolls.
Yet many people--especially autistic adults--are frustrated by how little benefit has actually materialized.