autochthon


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au·toch·thon

 (ô-tŏk′thən)
n. pl. au·toch·thons or au·toch·tho·nes (-thə-nēz′)
1. One that originated or was formed where it is found, especially a rock formation that has not been displaced.
2. One of the earliest known inhabitants of a place; an aborigine.
3. Ecology An indigenous plant or animal.

[Greek autokhthōn : auto-, auto- + khthōn, earth; see dhghem- in Indo-European roots.]

autochthon

(ɔːˈtɒkθən; -θɒn)
n, pl -thons or -thones (-θəˌniːz)
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) (often plural) one of the earliest known inhabitants of any country; aboriginal
2. (Biology) an animal or plant that is native to a particular region
[C17: from Greek autokhthōn from the earth itself, from auto- + khthōn the earth]

au•toch•thon

(ɔˈtɒk θən)

n., pl. -thons, -tho•nes (-θəˌniz)
1. an aboriginal inhabitant.
2. one of the indigenous animals or plants of a region.
[1640–50; < Greek autóchthōn=auto- auto-1 + chthṓn the earth, land, ground]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.autochthon - the earliest known inhabitants of a region
primitive, primitive person - a person who belongs to an early stage of civilization
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The creation of complete presentation of the PD concept system, reflected in the cognitive map, requires the determination of its 'skeleton'--the autochthon concepts and the partial outline of the corpus of PD allochthons as discursive variables.
Part of the land surrounding the hamlet of Srouhedji was included in the PFR, with parcels registered in the name of Miniffi autochthons, thus creating a new distinction between the autochthons whose lands were surveyed and the others, between hamlets included in the PFR and over which autochthon control was reinforced and those that refused to register or were denied registration.
The village has [approximately equal to] 1,000 inhabitants of both Bantu and Autochthon (Pygmy) ethnic groups.
Upper Cretaceous planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the Bey Daglari Autochthon in the Korkuteli area, western Taurides, Turkey.
Inside of Greece, those better educated outsiders mobilized autochthon Greeks to fight and die along the most emotional elements of identity and religion; for them, liberation from the Ottomans was "the triumph of Christian good over Muslim tyranny." (75) Fleming finds that large numbers of outsiders caused further emphasis on the local version of Orthodox Christianity as a real marker of Greekness and local origin.
As to the common ancestry of the three autochthon groups viz, the Meiteis, Nagas and Kukis, the British ethnologist T.C.
(1990) "Kreusa the Autochthon: A Study of Euripides' Ion", en Winkler J.
Macedonia remains leading example of organic honey production, and the autochthon Macedonian honey bee, is living in the same conditions as the one in Europe 150 years ago, protected from chemicals and thriving in ecologically clean environment.
This point may not have been stressed enough by the author: These migrants are certainly not 'capitalists' but they do contribute some capital to fund their transportation, possibly pay some ganti rugi (compensation) to an autochthon family, and certainly pay for the services of an influential autochthon.
Have always thought of myself as a kind of autochthon. A poet told me once that if you take root, you will grow.
autumnalis must have been autochthon. Climatic changes and animal movement from one region to another can contribute to the diffusion of these mites (Giannoulopoulos et al., 2012), and the presence of small rodents (primary hosts for larvae mites) (Cosoroaba, 2005) facilitates mite population growth in new biotopes.
Polymerase chain reaction method for leptospirosis, analysis on samples from an autochthon swine population in Sicily, Italy.