autochthonous

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au·toch·tho·nous

 (ô-tŏk′thə-nəs) also au·toch·tho·nal (-thə-nəl) or au·toch·thon·ic (ô′tŏk-thŏn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Originating or formed in the place where found; indigenous: autochthonous rocks; an autochthonous people; autochthonous folk tales. See Synonyms at native.
2. Ecology Native to or produced within a system: an autochthonous species; algae that provide an autochthonous source of nutrients in a lake.

au·toch′thon·ism, au·toch′tho·ny n.
au·toch′tho·nous·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

autochthonous

(ɔːˈtɒkθənəs) ,

autochthonic

or

autochthonal

adj
1. (Geological Science) (of rocks, deposits, etc) found where they and their constituents were formed. Compare allochthonous
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) inhabiting a place or region from earliest known times; aboriginal
3. (Physiology) physiol (of some functions, such as heartbeat) originating within an organ rather than from external stimulation
auˈtochthonism, auˈtochthony n
auˈtochthonously adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

au•toch•tho•nous

(ɔˈtɒk θə nəs)

also au•toch′tho•nal,



adj.
1. aboriginal; indigenous.
2. native to or formed in the place where found.
3. Pathol. located in a part of the body in which it originated, as a cancer or infection.
4. Psychol. of or pertaining to ideas that originate independently of normal modes of thought or influences, as an obsession or schizophrenic construct.
[1795–1805]
au•toch′tho•nism, au•toch′tho•ny, n.
au•toch′tho•nous•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.autochthonous - of rocks, deposits, etc.autochthonous - of rocks, deposits, etc.; found where they and their constituents were formed
allochthonous - of rocks, deposits, etc.; found in a place other than where they and their constituents were formed
2.autochthonous - originating where it is foundautochthonous - originating where it is found; "the autochthonal fauna of Australia includes the kangaroo"; "autochthonous rocks and people and folktales"; "endemic folkways"; "the Ainu are indigenous to the northernmost islands of Japan"
native - characteristic of or existing by virtue of geographic origin; "the native North American sugar maple"; "many native artists studied abroad"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

autochthonous

adjective
Existing, born, or produced in a land or region:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
autohton
autochtoniczny

autochthonous

[ɔːˈtɒkθənəs] ADJautóctono
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) No earthly landscape is autochthonously inhabited or inscribed; there is instead an irretrievable and incessant distancing, at work between "earth" and "writing," and at work also within these terms.
This has the added advantage of allowing worlds to emerge autochthonously from texts rather than placing texts in worlds, with all of its political baggage.
nihonkaiense has been extensively reported in Japan (3,4), but it has also occurred autochthonously in South Korea (8) and the Far Eastern Federal District of Russia (originally reported as D.
I do not doubt a certain ethnic motivation in Fishbane's works: he argued explicitly that modes of interpretation in rabbinic Judaism were neither handed down by God at Sinai, nor borrowed from the Greco-Roman environment, but rather, developed autochthonously by Jews through the centuries.