autocracy

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au·toc·ra·cy

 (ô-tŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. au·toc·ra·cies
1. Government by a single person having unlimited power; despotism.
2. A country or state that is governed by a single person with unlimited power.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

autocracy

(ɔːˈtɒkrəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) government by an individual with unrestricted authority
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the unrestricted authority of such an individual
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a country, society, etc, ruled by an autocrat
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

au•toc•ra•cy

(ɔˈtɒk rə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. government in which one person has unlimited authority; the government of an autocrat.
2. a nation, state, or community ruled by an autocrat.
3. the unlimited power or authority of an autocrat.
[1645–55; < Greek autokráteia]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

autocracy

1. a government in which one person has unrestricted control over others.
2. a country with an autocratic system. — autocrat, n.autocratic, adj.
See also: Government
a society or nation ruled by a person with absolute authority. — autocrat, n. — autocratie, adj.
See also: Society
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.autocracy - a political system governed by a single individualautocracy - a political system governed by a single individual
monarchy - an autocracy governed by a monarch who usually inherits the authority
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power
dictatorship, monocracy, one-man rule, shogunate, Stalinism, totalitarianism, tyranny, authoritarianism, Caesarism, despotism, absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
2.autocracy - a political theory favoring unlimited authority by a single individual
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Machiavellianism - the political doctrine of Machiavelli: any means (however unscrupulous) can be used by a ruler in order to create and maintain his autocratic government
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

autocracy

noun dictatorship, tyranny, despotism, absolutism Many poor countries are abandoning autocracy.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

autocracy

noun
1. A government in which a single leader or party exercises absolute control over all citizens and every aspect of their lives:
2. A political doctrine advocating the principle of absolute rule:
3. Absolute power, especially when exercised unjustly or cruelly:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
حُكم فَرْدي
samovláda
diktaturenevælde
önkényuralom
einveldi, alræîi
samovláda
mutlakiyetotokrosi

autocracy

[ɔːˈtɒkrəsɪ] Nautocracia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

autocracy

[ɔːˈtɒkrəsi] n
(method of government)autocratie f
(= country, organization) → autocratie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

autocracy

nAutokratie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

autocrat

(ˈoːtəkrӕt) noun
a ruler who has total control. The Tsars of Russia were autocrats.
autocracy (oːˈtokrəsi) noun
government by an autocrat.
ˌautoˈcratic adjective
1. having absolute power. an autocratic government.
2. expecting complete obedience. a very autocratic father.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The rise of authoritarian regimes in countries such as Haiti, Fiji and the Philippines are examples of countries where frequent severe storm events could have been a contributor to why these countries governments have remained autocratic over longer periods of time - these are countries we're now dubbing 'storm autocracies'.
Dismissing claims of overextended US resources and perceived safety, Miller argues that nuclear autocracies, armed non-state actors, failed states, and the transnational jihadist movement still pose immense threats to American security and the international system.
Stable democracies and autocracies share a stable balance of power between their various power factions.
As China and other Asian countries have shown, some autocracies can prosper when their leaders prioritise sensible economic policies.
In the past, autocracies were empires, kingdoms, and monarchies.
Turning to the question of regime type, they find that democracies and hybrid regimes outperform autocracies in using economic growth to improve average caloric consumption, which is interpreted as helping the poor.
Drawing on past studies (Li & Wu, 2010, Schofield & Gallego, 2011; Shleifer & Vishny, 1993), we propose corruption will affect economic performance in different ways under the following three different political regimes: autocracies (dictatorships or totalitarian regimes), anocracies (including emerging and infant democracies), and democracies (1).
They also persuaded thousands of Europeans, Arabs and others to join the Islamic State as foreign fighters; and tens of thousands to seek refuge in Europe from civil war, brutal repression, and economic despair.Across the board, democracies and autocracies alike are experiencing the blowback of decades of Band-Aid solutions, policies that failed to give youth prospects for a future with a stake in society, and repression largely unchallenged by Western governments that pay lip service to adherence to political pluralism, inclusiveness, and human and minority rights in various parts of the world, particularly the Middle East and North Africa.
This is the first time Western countries are facing an autocracy built by a democratically elected government as opposed to the autocracies established by military governments in the past.
Given this, it would be a sheer stupidity to expect if this social club of the Arab autocracies would come in any real sense to the rescue of the beleaguered Gazans, being clobbered by a wicked Israeli military and its vile political leadership so ruthlessly over these past several days with the world community largely looking on silently, if not collusively.
Such a transition by the 61-year-old emir, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, would be highly unusual among the Gulf Arab autocracies, where most rulers remain until death.
He argues that since oppressive autocracies have fueled the rise of militant Islamism, only drawing Islamists into the humdrum daily practice of democratic politics--with its inevitable disappointments and compromises--can break the fever of fanaticism.