autocracy

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au·toc·ra·cy

 (ô-tŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. au·toc·ra·cies
1. Government by a single person having unlimited power; despotism.
2. A country or state that is governed by a single person with unlimited power.

autocracy

(ɔːˈtɒkrəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) government by an individual with unrestricted authority
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the unrestricted authority of such an individual
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a country, society, etc, ruled by an autocrat

au•toc•ra•cy

(ɔˈtɒk rə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. government in which one person has unlimited authority; the government of an autocrat.
2. a nation, state, or community ruled by an autocrat.
3. the unlimited power or authority of an autocrat.
[1645–55; < Greek autokráteia]

autocracy

1. a government in which one person has unrestricted control over others.
2. a country with an autocratic system. — autocrat, n.autocratic, adj.
See also: Government
a society or nation ruled by a person with absolute authority. — autocrat, n. — autocratie, adj.
See also: Society
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.autocracy - a political system governed by a single individualautocracy - a political system governed by a single individual
monarchy - an autocracy governed by a monarch who usually inherits the authority
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power
dictatorship, monocracy, one-man rule, shogunate, Stalinism, totalitarianism, tyranny, authoritarianism, Caesarism, despotism, absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
2.autocracy - a political theory favoring unlimited authority by a single individual
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Machiavellianism - the political doctrine of Machiavelli: any means (however unscrupulous) can be used by a ruler in order to create and maintain his autocratic government

autocracy

noun dictatorship, tyranny, despotism, absolutism Many poor countries are abandoning autocracy.

autocracy

noun
1. A government in which a single leader or party exercises absolute control over all citizens and every aspect of their lives:
2. A political doctrine advocating the principle of absolute rule:
3. Absolute power, especially when exercised unjustly or cruelly:
Translations
حُكم فَرْدي
samovláda
diktaturenevælde
önkényuralom
einveldi, alræîi
samovláda
mutlakiyetotokrosi

autocracy

[ɔːˈtɒkrəsɪ] Nautocracia f

autocracy

[ɔːˈtɒkrəsi] n
(method of government)autocratie f
(= country, organization) → autocratie f

autocracy

nAutokratie f

autocrat

(ˈoːtəkrӕt) noun
a ruler who has total control. The Tsars of Russia were autocrats.
autocracy (oːˈtokrəsi) noun
government by an autocrat.
ˌautoˈcratic adjective
1. having absolute power. an autocratic government.
2. expecting complete obedience. a very autocratic father.
References in periodicals archive ?
Turning to the question of regime type, they find that democracies and hybrid regimes outperform autocracies in using economic growth to improve average caloric consumption, which is interpreted as helping the poor.
Drawing on past studies (Li & Wu, 2010, Schofield & Gallego, 2011; Shleifer & Vishny, 1993), we propose corruption will affect economic performance in different ways under the following three different political regimes: autocracies (dictatorships or totalitarian regimes), anocracies (including emerging and infant democracies), and democracies (1).
After 600 years of duplicitous relations with Africa, the West's outlook on the continent has not changed much, says Frindethie; the Euro-American powers continue to throw their military weight around, brutalizing and coercing the African people into accepting propped-up autocracies that are relevant only insofar as they cater to all of the European-American exigencies first, leaving Africa depleted.
Across the board, democracies and autocracies alike are experiencing the blowback of decades of Band-Aid solutions, policies that failed to give youth prospects for a future with a stake in society, and repression largely unchallenged by Western governments that pay lip service to adherence to political pluralism, inclusiveness, and human and minority rights in various parts of the world, particularly the Middle East and North Africa.
This is the first time Western countries are facing an autocracy built by a democratically elected government as opposed to the autocracies established by military governments in the past.
Given this, it would be a sheer stupidity to expect if this social club of the Arab autocracies would come in any real sense to the rescue of the beleaguered Gazans, being clobbered by a wicked Israeli military and its vile political leadership so ruthlessly over these past several days with the world community largely looking on silently, if not collusively.
Such a transition by the 61-year-old emir, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, would be highly unusual among the Gulf Arab autocracies, where most rulers remain until death.
He argues that since oppressive autocracies have fueled the rise of militant Islamism, only drawing Islamists into the humdrum daily practice of democratic politics--with its inevitable disappointments and compromises--can break the fever of fanaticism.
Arabs seem to favour functioning monarchies rather than despotic, one-party autocracies.
For instance, of the countries that had at least 1 year in an autocratic regime, countries within autocracies less than the average of 63 years had significantly higher growth rates and real income in the 1990s than countries with more than the average number of years within autocracies.
He assesses Iran's Green movement as promising liberal democratic change and undermining the power of the Islamic clergy; discusses and even promotes the possible role of Islamist groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood in spurring democratic change in the Arab autocracies (even as he judges the autocracies to be relatively strong and resistant to change, albeit suffering from a lack of legitimacy); assesses the health of Turkish democracy under the Islamist AKP (Justice and Development Party); and offers advice to the United States to abandon its preference for secular dictatorships due to fear of Islamist participation in government and to engage in debates about democracy in the region.