autoinfection


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to autoinfection: hyperinfection, retroinfection

au·to·in·fec·tion

 (ô′tō-ĭn-fĕk′shən)
n.
Infection, such as recurrent boils, caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites that persist on or in the body.

autoinfection

(ˌɔːtəʊɪnˈfɛkʃən)
n
(Pathology) infection by a pathogenic agent already within the body or infection transferred from one part of the body to another

au•to•in•fec•tion

(ˌɔ toʊ ɪnˈfɛk ʃən)

n.
infection caused by a pathogen that is already in one's own body.
[1900–05]
Translations

autoinfection

n (Med) → Autoinfektion f

au·to·in·fec·tion

n. autoinfección, infección causada por un agente del propio organismo.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the small intestine they molt twice and become adult female worms and lay eggs from which rhabditiform larvae hatch which can either be passed in the stool or can cause autoinfection. Autoinfection explains the possibility of chronic infection, hyperinfection and disseminated disease spectrum observed in the infected patients.
philippinensis cause true infections (and autoinfection) with eggs found in stool; the infection is linked to consumption of raw fish.
'There is nothing like toilet infection, it is either an STI or an autoinfection meaning infecting one's self as a result of bad personal hygiene.
Strongyloides stercoralis assumes a special status due to its versatile life cycle (Autoinfection) and its potential to cause long-lasting infections, particularly in immunosuppressed individuals with a defective cellmediated immunity, in whom it may lead to hyperinfection syndrome and disseminated strongyloidiasis involving several organs.
It can present as acute infection, autoinfection, chronic infection, hyperinfection, and disseminated disease.
[3] Hyperinfection denotes autoinfection with accelerated gastrointestinal and pulmonary symptoms.
(3) It can cause autoinfection, chronic persistent infection, hyperinfection (with involvement of the lung and the gastrointestinal system), and disseminated infection involving other organs.
Therefore, if not treated, because this is an autoinfection process, the host may remain in a chronic carrier state for decades [10].
This association can be related to autoinfection that represents an important source of transmission to another location of the same body [49].
Autoinfection occurs in hosts with an impaired cell-mediated immune response.
autoinfection, (4) parthenogenesis and external phase of life cycle with a free living adult.
This longevity of Strongyloides is related to its unique and complex life cycle with its alternation between free-living and parasitic cycles and the propensity for autoinfection and multiplication within the infected host [2].