autokinetic


Also found in: Medical.
Related to autokinetic: autokinetic phenomenon

autokinetic

(ˌɔːtəʊkɪˈnɛtɪk; -kaɪ-)
adj
automatically self-moving
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References in periodicals archive ?
You're friends with a psychic medium who you think can communicate with our dead relatives, and you think seeing some moving light in your room is evidence of this (it's not; it's called the "autokinetic effect").
5 points: the rats could move normally when they were caught by the back; 4 points: the rats had reduced autokinetic movement and could turn over within 5 s; 3 points: the turn over time was over 5 min; 2 points: the rats could not turn over; 1 point: the rats could not move; 0 points: the rats died.
Everyday things, fantastically animated, became staples, but also reflected the autokinetic effect of the medium itself.
High hypnotic susceptibility is also associated with increased susceptibility to visual illusions, such as autokinetic movement, the Ponzo illusion, the Necker Cube, and the Schroeder Staircase illusion (Crawford, Brown, & Moon, 1993; Nadon, Laurence, & Perry, 1987; Spanos et al., 1989; Wallace, 1980, 1988; Wallace, Garrett, & Anstadt, 1974; Wallace, Knight, & Garrett, 1976), which may provide experimental analogues to the magical ideation and perceptual aberrations of schizotypy.
Sherif (1935) used the autokinetic effect, the illusory perception that a point of light in a darkened room is in motion, and asked participants, individually or in groups of two or three, to sit in a lightproof and soundproof room and estimate the distance that a spot of light moves.
We will call the ratio [tau] = l /v, that is, the time required to traverse the organism's own body length l at its maximal locomotion speed v, "autokinetic time." (10) It is reasonable to assume that intra-organismic information processing, from sensory input to motor output, must proceed at rates comparable with the rate of change in the organism's perception/action field induced by the organism's active motion.
Autokinesis, sometimes called autokinetic effect, is perceived movement exhibited by a static dim light when it is stared at in the dark.
(264) See Robert Steven Baron & Gard Roper, Reaffirmation of Social Comparison Views of Choice Shifts: Averaging and Extremity Effects in an Autokinetic Situation, 33 J.