automatism


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au·tom·a·tism

 (ô-tŏm′ə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The state or quality of being automatic.
b. Automatic mechanical action.
2. Philosophy The theory that the body is a machine whose functions are accompanied but not controlled by consciousness.
3. Physiology
a. The involuntary functioning of an organ or other body structure that is not under conscious control, such as the beating of the heart or the dilation of the pupil of the eye.
b. The reflexive action of a body part.
4. Psychology Mechanical, seemingly aimless behavior characteristic of various mental disorders.

[From Latin automaton, automaton; see automaton.]

au·tom′a·tist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

automatism

(ɔːˈtɒməˌtɪzəm)
n
1. the state or quality of being automatic; mechanical or involuntary action
2. (Law) law philosophy the explanation of an action, or of action in general, as determined by the physiological states of the individual, admissible in law as a defence when the physiological state is involuntary, as in sleepwalking
3. (Philosophy) law philosophy the explanation of an action, or of action in general, as determined by the physiological states of the individual, admissible in law as a defence when the physiological state is involuntary, as in sleepwalking
4. (Psychology) psychol the performance of actions, such as sleepwalking, without conscious knowledge or control
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the suspension of consciousness sought or achieved by certain artists and writers to allow free flow of uncensored thoughts
6. (Art Terms) the suspension of consciousness sought or achieved by certain artists and writers to allow free flow of uncensored thoughts
auˈtomatist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

au•tom•a•tism

(ɔˈtɒm əˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. the action or condition of being automatic; mechanical or involuntary action.
2. the theory that the activities of humans and animals are controlled by physical or physiological causes rather than by consciousness.
3. the involuntary functioning of an organic process, esp. muscular, without apparent neural stimulation.
4. Psychol. the performance of an act or actions without the performer's awareness or conscious volition.
5. an artistic technique in which the impulses of the unconscious mind are freed to guide the hand in producing images.
[1880–85; < Greek automatismós a happening of itself. See automaton, -ism]
au•tom′a•tist, n., adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

automatism

an automatic or involuntary action. — automatist, n.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.automatism - any reaction that occurs automatically without conscious thought or reflection (especially the undirected behavior seen in psychomotor epilepsy)
response, reaction - a bodily process occurring due to the effect of some antecedent stimulus or agent; "a bad reaction to the medicine"; "his responses have slowed with age"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

automatism

[ɔːˈtɒmətɪzəm] Nautomatismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

au·tom·a·tism

n. automatismo, conducta que no está bajo control voluntario.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In claiming that the defence of insane automatism would inevitably lead to a not guilty verdict, it's unclear whether sufficient weight is being given to the evidence of dangerous driving, with several independent witnesses, well before the collision.
Burnout is a psychological syndrome, characterised by a symptomatic triad: emotional exhaustion (EE), including feelings of tiredness and emptiness; depersonalisation (DP), such as a lack of empathy, increased levels of cynicism and automatism; and a lack of personal accomplishment (PA), including a lack of self-esteem and increased levels of frustration.
The latter is a motley group of writers and artists, between ages of 14 and 38, from part-time models and students to psychoanalysts and editors, approaching the craft mainly through the aegis of automatism.
But driver George Steele was not taken to court by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) because lawyers claimed he was "in a daze or unresponsive" beforehand and might have been suffering from "insane automatism".
He claimed he suffered from a rare sleeping disorder known as "sexsomnia" or "sleep-related sexual behaviour", a form of non-insane automatism.
Belfast Crown Court heard he had been suffering from automatism - or sleep walking - since the age of eight.
TWO men from Cheltenham accused of smashing up a betting shop in the town have denied the charges, claiming they were suffering from 'automatism' due to a gambling addiction.
He had complaint of seizures presented by falling, tonic spasm of limbs, oral automatism, vocalization, and hypermotor activities.
Contending "that the ultimate aim of Coleridgean education is to turn the working of free will into the automatism of habit" (2), Timar scrutinizes Coleridge's idea of the human by focusing on three concepts that seem to reveal the complex entanglements and potential material determinacy of the Coleridgean will.
Loughnan to analyze a wide range of doctrines including infancy, unfitness to plead, automatism, infanticide, intoxication and diminished responsibility, as well as insanity.
The defence say he did not do it - but are also putting forward an alternative defence that if the jury find that he did the killing, that he did it in the aftermath of an epileptic event, that he was labouring under an "insane automatism".
She starts by examining mental evolution from that time to now and then, in which the mind had strong links to will, automatism, spiritual experience, and the "dreamy mind." She then explores several pieces of literature and authors, including Charlotte Bronte's hypochondriac heroines, sprits and seizures in Bleak House and Our Mutual Friend, suspended animation in Daniel Deronda and Silas Marner, dreamy intuition and detective genius in Ezra Jennings and Sherlock Holmes, and naturalism and reverie in Tess of the D'Urbervilles and The Return of the Native.

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