automobilism

Related to automobilism: Forward rate agreement

automobilism

(ˌɔːtəʊˈməʊbɪˌlɪzəm) or

automobility

n
the use of automobiles, or the practices associated with them

automobilism

the use or care of automobiles. — automobilist, n.automobility, n.
See also: Automation
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References in periodicals archive ?
Speck, a city planner and urban designer who advocates for more walkable cities, enumerates 101 short-term city planning practices to make cities more walkable, related to selling walkability, mixing uses of the community, making housing attainable and integrated, parking, transit, escaping automobilism, safety, optimizing the driving network, creating the right number and size of lanes, selling cycling, building a bike network, using street parking, focusing on geometry and intersections, making sidewalks right, creating comfortable spaces, creating interesting places, and taking action now.
Given their homes in the South Downs, and given the increasingly accessible drive to London from Monk's House and Charleston, the act of owning and operating a car was glossed for Woolf and Bell by the effects of automobilism on the countryside--a countryside that was becoming more accessible to day tourists and visitors alike.
(1) Kurt Moser, 'The Dark Side of "Automobilism", 1900-30: Violence, War and the Motor Car', Journal of Transport History, 24:2 (2003), 238-58.
Corinna Kuhr-Korolev and Dirk Schlinkert, eds., Towards Mobility: Varieties of Automobilism in East and West.
Author Siegelbaum (history, Michigan State U.) touches upon a broad range of subjects, giving a concise history of the automobile industry itself, but also delving into the idea of Soviet "automobilism" as sociocultural practice and examining the ways the privateness of the automobile interacted and conflicted with state goals.
(91) Kurt Moser, 'The dark side of "automobilism", 1900-1930: Violence, war and the motor car', The Journal of Transport History, series 3, vol.
William Lea invented the first driving school when he set up the Liver Motor Car Depot and School of Automobilism in Birkenhead in 1901.
There is a photo of the early, puffing 1845 teapot locomotive and a preview of "automobilism," showing the carriage-like contraption preceded by a man carrying a red flag, to warn the world of what was coming.
He speaks of 'the lack of mobility, the lack of curiosity, and the hopelessness of the Dark Ages from which the motor cat plucked us', and apparently believes that 'the Dark Ages lasted a long time and it took the car to free us front them.' There is a certain fascination about this kind of extremist automobilism: it has the sheer exuberance of Mr Toad in spades.
Spencer modifies this contention in so far as he expects the reconciliation of the two tendencies to take place in the future, when evolution has reached a higher stage of development in which the 'pursuit of the altruistic pleasure has become a higher order of egoistic pleasure'.42 Davidson's aristocratic, individualist speaker in 'The Testament of Sir Simon Simplex Concerning Automobilism' (1908) protests against the collectivist demands on the individual symbolized by the railway as the harbinger of mass society, and enthusiastically hails the newly invented automobile as signifying the rebirth of individualism and re-establishing a link between the present and the glorious past:
Following the publication of this manifesto, Lewis immediately dissociated himself and his movement from the futurists through a series of press articles in which he claimed to be unmoved by Marinetti's "automobilism ...