auxiliary verb


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to auxiliary verb: Modal auxiliary verb

auxiliary verb

Auxiliary verbs (also called helping verbs) are verbs that add functional meaning to other “main” or “full” verbs in a clause. They are used to create different tenses or aspects, to form negatives and interrogatives, or to add emphasis to a sentence. However, they do not have semantic meaning unto themselves.
Continue reading...

auxiliary verb

n. Abbr. aux. or aux. v.
A verb, such as have, can, or will, that accompanies the main verb in a clause and helps to make distinctions in mood, voice, aspect, and tense.

auxiliary verb

n
(Grammar) a verb used to indicate the tense, voice, mood, etc, of another verb where this is not indicated by inflection, such as English will in he will go, was in he was eating and he was eaten, do in I do like you, etc

auxil′iary verb′


n.
a verb used in construction with certain forms of other verbs, as infinitives or participles, to express distinctions of tense, aspect, mood, etc., as did in Did you go?, have in We have spoken, or can in They can see. Also called helping verb.
[1755–65]

auxiliary verb

A verb that accompanies and augments the meaning of a main verb, for example, “can” in “can do.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.auxiliary verb - a verb that combines with another verb in a verb phrase to help form tense, mood, voice, or condition of the verb it combines with
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
modal, modal auxiliary, modal auxiliary verb, modal verb - an auxiliary verb (such as `can' or `will') that is used to express modality
Translations
pomocné sloveso
apuverbi
segédige
hjálparsagnorðhjálparsögn
조동사
yardımcı fiil
References in classic literature ?
He - probably swayed by prudential consideration of the folly of offending a good tenant - relaxed a little in the laconic style of chipping off his pronouns and auxiliary verbs, and introduced what he supposed would be a subject of interest to me, - a discourse on the advantages and disadvantages of my present place of retirement.
." so ran the questions, considerably devoid of auxiliary verbs and such details of construction.
Is it actually the low tone of the subject clitic pronoun or the high tone of the auxiliary verb ya that marks negation in 20b?
The other l-participle forms always appear with the auxiliary verb to be in its various forms (examples follow in the next section): the imperfective Perfect Tense (in the Pluperfect) , the conditional form (in the Present Conditional), the entire Present Conditional (in the Past Conditional) and the imperfective Present Tense (in Future II).
Finnish texts representing different centuries show that agreement of the negative auxiliary verb with the subject was on the decline; rather, the personal forms of the negative auxiliary tended to vary freely, e.g.
The Japanese passive is composed of a verb and an auxiliary verb (r)are.
Thus, modals, being auxiliary verbs, are subject to processes (inversion, raising over the negative particle and optional contraction with it, etc.) forbidden to particles.
Furthermore, Miestamo (2007) has observed that some languages use interrogative auxiliary verbs to mark polar interrogation.
Rather than abandon one analysis or the other, both are reconciled through appeal to the process of Compound Verb Contraction, or simply Contraction, a morphosyntactic process which applies to compound verb constructions and involves a fusing of the main and the auxiliary verbs into a simple word.
I Assign be (past, been) in all persons for predication or as an auxiliary verb -- normally succeeded by an adjective (including a present or past participle).
Researchers share little conviction that the l-type forms could be explained as *e- deverbal derivatives of a negative auxiliary verb or a semantic antonym of the verb *ela- 'to live' ('to live' = 'to be' and 'to be' ~ 'not to be').
The problem of do-support and other auxiliary verb structures do not fit conveniently into this framework.