auxin


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aux·in

 (ôk′sĭn)
n.
Any of several plant hormones that regulate various functions, including cell elongation.

[From Greek auxein, to grow; see aug- in Indo-European roots.]

aux·in′ic adj.
aux·in′i·cal·ly adv.

auxin

(ˈɔːksɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) any of various plant hormones, such as indoleacetic acid, that promote growth and control fruit and flower development. Synthetic auxins are widely used in agriculture and horticulture
[C20: from Greek auxein to grow]

aux•in

(ˈɔk sɪn)

n.
any of a class of substances that in minute amounts regulate or modify the growth of plants, esp. root formation, bud growth, and fruit and leaf drop.
[< German (1931) < Greek aúx(ein) to increase + German -in -in1]
aux•in′ic, adj.

aux·in

(ôk′sĭn)
Any of various hormones or similar substances that promote and regulate the growth and development of plants. Auxins are produced in areas (called the meristem) in which new plant cells are formed. Auxins are also produced artificially in laboratories for purposes such as speeding growth and regulating how fast a fruit will ripen.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.auxin - a plant hormone that promotes root formation and bud growthauxin - a plant hormone that promotes root formation and bud growth
growth regulator, phytohormone, plant hormone - (botany) a plant product that acts like a hormone
IAA, indoleacetic acid - a plant hormone promoting elongation of stems and roots
indolebutyric acid - a synthetic plant hormone promoting elongation of stems and roots
Translations

auxin

[ˈɔːksɪn] nauxina
References in periodicals archive ?
Addition of L-TRP to different soils inoculated with various rhizobacteria also effectively stimulated auxin (IAA-equivalents) production relative to unamended (no TRP) soil inoculated with the same rhizobacteria, most likely due to L-TRP serving as an auxin precursor.
Arabinogalactan protein, auxin and ovary co-culture may be added to the induction medium to enhance embryogenesis from microspores.
The first hormone discovered to cause root growth is called auxin, and the synthetic version of auxin is what we find in commercially sold compounds today.
The mechanism by which a key hormone called auxin regulates the growth and development of plants by promoting the degradation of repressor proteins has been discovered by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.
The phenomenon of root gravitropic curvature is a three part process: gravity perception in the cap via a starch statolith-based gravisensor; signal transduction resulting in the modification of basipetal auxin flux patterns; and downward curvature due to differential growth rates on the upper and lower root surfaces.
When light hits outer flower petals it triggers a hormone (function-controlling chemical) called auxin that causes cells to grow and expand.
Indoleacetic acid (IAA) is the most commonly occurring natural auxin (Figure 4-1).
A YOUR rubber tree has only one stem because side shoots are suppressed by a chemical called an auxin produced in the growing tip.
Beltsville, Md 20705) have genetically altered the levels of auxin, a hormone which causes a tomato to grow and ripen.
Of the five major plant hormones, auxin has been known the longest and is probably the most important.
Some genes were clear involved in stem development, such as cell development (T1-51819), organ morphogenesis (T1-56670), organ growth (T1-59903; T3-17722; T1-56578; T3-10488), auxin mediated signaling pathway, meristem development and response to cytokinin stimulus (T1-67257; T4-32688), cellulase activity (T3-14939), lignin biosynthetic process (T1-66751; T4-38347), these were typical biological processes of stem development.
Experimental results showed the potential of clonal propagation of guava through soft wood cuttings treated with auxin under simpler and cheaper low-plastic tunnel.