avant-garde

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a·vant-garde

 (ä′vänt-gärd′, ăv′änt-)
n.
A group that creates or promotes innovative ideas or techniques in a given field, especially in the arts.
adj.
Of, relating to, or being part of an innovative group, especially one in the arts: avant-garde painters; an avant-garde theater piece.

[French, from Old French, vanguard; see vanguard.]

a′vant-gard′ism n.
a′vant-gard′ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

avant-garde

(ˌævɒŋˈɡɑːd; French avɑ̃ɡard)
n
those artists, writers, musicians, etc, whose techniques and ideas are markedly experimental or in advance of those generally accepted
adj
1. of such artists, etc, their ideas, or techniques
2. radical; daring
[from French: vanguard]
ˌavant-ˈgardism n
ˌavant-ˈgardist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•vant-garde

(əˌvɑntˈgɑrd, əˌvænt-, ˌæv ɑnt-, ˌɑ vɑnt-; Fr. a vɑ̃ˈgard)

n.
1. the advance group in a field, esp. in the arts, whose works are unorthodox and experimental.
adj.
2. characteristic of or belonging to the avant-garde.
[1910–15; < French: literally, fore-guard. See vanguard]
a•vant`-gard′ism, n.
a•vant`-gard′ist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

avant-garde

A French phrase meaning a vanguard, used to describe artists or ideas that are ahead of their time.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.avant-garde - any creative group active in the innovation and application of new concepts and techniques in a given field (especially in the arts)
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Adj.1.avant-garde - radically new or original; "an avant-garde theater piece"
original - being or productive of something fresh and unusual; or being as first made or thought of; "a truly original approach"; "with original music"; "an original mind"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

avant-garde

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

avant-garde

[ˈævɑːŋˈgɑːd]
A. ADJvanguardista, de vanguardia
B. Nvanguardia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

avant-garde

[ˌævɒŋˈgɑːrd] adjd'avant-garde
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

avant-garde

nAvantgarde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

avant-garde

[ˈævɒŋˈgɑːd]
1. navanguardia
2. adjd'avanguardia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In the last decade, there is not much of Abu Dhabi that has been left untouched by modernity and avant-gardism as the Capital galloped into the world map as a sought-after tourist destination.
Today, the same ideas and psychologically soothing processes produce not the challenging works we associate with avant-gardism, but the well-honed seriality of a celebrity brand--from her throwback monochromes and sleek, fabricated, polka-dotted things, to her consummately Instagrammable mirrored installations.
Harnessing the power of culture as a means to advance Italy's international reputation, Marinetti preached to foreign audiences about the greatness of Fascism, partially through its connection to Futurism, linking the regime's more unsavory policies to the international attributes of Futurism's avant-gardism.
Moreover, Iran's language poetry, though not following a historical strategic avant-gardism, always claimed to be avant-garde and minor at the same time, avant-garde in the sense that they claimed to write a kind of poetry that follows the universal postmodern avant-garde poetry, and minor in the sense that they also tried to grow into the framework of an exclusive group of writers who wrote against the fixed forms of accepted poetry.
He argues that avant-gardism in the Chinese music industry may produce queer performativity, but the state's push for the commercialism of the industry turns potentially political performativity into purely cool-looking performances.
Saber was described as a "promising avant-gardism artist" when he took his first steps into the music world in 1985.
Her research explores intersections between rock music and avant-gardism in the work of the Velvet Underground, Yoko Ono, Brian Eno, and Sonic Youth.
Foix may have seen his recourse to surrealism as a "stylistic elevation" of the Catalan language, as he suggested in his 1921 essay "Avant-gardism," but his fantastic images signify further, in excess of that literary nationalism.
Chronologically last in the sequence of ECM's cover art, this one suggests that Johnson's novel has found reception as a work of literary avant-gardism.
"This Russian nobility is now able to create an entirely European literature, filled with French, English and German influences." Or: "Literature and music, although original, were entirely European and rightfully entered the universal heritage." The Russian ballet has been born from the "fertile seed planted by the French choreography school", the Kremlin and its churches "have been elevated by Italian masters", and Kandinsky and Malevich avant-gardism has raised the interest of the French art because "it initiated the entire movement".
Whether or not Casati truly subscribed to artistic avant-gardism, the diversity of her collection and patronage demonstrate an indifference to its supposed cliques and hierarchies, and its myth of complete rupture with the decadentism that went before it.