avant-garde

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a·vant-garde

 (ä′vänt-gärd′, ăv′änt-)
n.
A group that creates or promotes innovative ideas or techniques in a given field, especially in the arts.
adj.
Of, relating to, or being part of an innovative group, especially one in the arts: avant-garde painters; an avant-garde theater piece.

[French, from Old French, vanguard; see vanguard.]

a′vant-gard′ism n.
a′vant-gard′ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

avant-garde

(ˌævɒŋˈɡɑːd; French avɑ̃ɡard)
n
those artists, writers, musicians, etc, whose techniques and ideas are markedly experimental or in advance of those generally accepted
adj
1. of such artists, etc, their ideas, or techniques
2. radical; daring
[from French: vanguard]
ˌavant-ˈgardism n
ˌavant-ˈgardist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•vant-garde

(əˌvɑntˈgɑrd, əˌvænt-, ˌæv ɑnt-, ˌɑ vɑnt-; Fr. a vɑ̃ˈgard)

n.
1. the advance group in a field, esp. in the arts, whose works are unorthodox and experimental.
adj.
2. characteristic of or belonging to the avant-garde.
[1910–15; < French: literally, fore-guard. See vanguard]
a•vant`-gard′ism, n.
a•vant`-gard′ist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

avant-garde

A French phrase meaning a vanguard, used to describe artists or ideas that are ahead of their time.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.avant-garde - any creative group active in the innovation and application of new concepts and techniques in a given field (especially in the arts)
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Adj.1.avant-garde - radically new or original; "an avant-garde theater piece"
original - being or productive of something fresh and unusual; or being as first made or thought of; "a truly original approach"; "with original music"; "an original mind"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

avant-garde

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

avant-garde

[ˈævɑːŋˈgɑːd]
A. ADJvanguardista, de vanguardia
B. Nvanguardia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

avant-garde

[ˌævɒŋˈgɑːrd] adjd'avant-garde
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

avant-garde

nAvantgarde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

avant-garde

[ˈævɒŋˈgɑːd]
1. navanguardia
2. adjd'avanguardia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
They approached Iris van Herpen, a Dutch avant-gardist who was a protege of Alexander McQueen.
Mikhail Lifshitz (1905-83) was born in Melitopol, a small city in present-day southern Ukraine, and in 1923 moved to Moscow to attend the avant-gardist Higher Art and Technical Studios (VKhUTEMAS), an institution that first took shape in 1918, was then officially formalized in 1920, renamed VKhUTEIN in 1926, and closed down in 1930.
Never one to be outdone, the American avant-gardist Owens brought out the heavy artillery, with codpiece bags big enough to smuggle an electric guitar.
German composer Giselher Klebe (1926-2009) is certainly not a full-blooded avant-gardist: he is the author of 140 traditionally constructed pieces, including 14 operas, 8 symphonies, 15 concertos and so on.
Ferris, the imaginary widowed daughter of writer Doivber Levin, a real, but minor, Russian avant-gardist, supplies its epigraph, "The Magnificent Art of Translating Life into a Story and Vice Versa." Drawn from the autobiography of a Russian bride whose Japanese husband transforms her life into art, Pilnyak's actual tale masquerades as history.
Dillon is an avant-gardist who is no stranger to the annual Huddersfield event.
"The Temperature of Sculpture" was an ambitious first survey of Jiro Takamatsu (1936-1998) outside his home country of Japan, significant not only because Takamatsu is a seminal postwar avant-gardist, but because the show was designed around key moments from his exhibition history.
Long associated in critical theory with problematic ideals of authentic subjectivity and bourgeois capitalism, and framed in poetry seminars as the residue of an unfashionable lyric tradition (particularly in the age of the Confessional and Language poets), romantic love seems irreconcilable with avant-gardist suspicions of the state, the family, and the prevailing order of things.
With Morocco's avant-gardist strategy for renewable energy development, its optimal weather conditions and Sweden's innovative technology solutions, focus is on how to continue developing the collaboration between the two countries, it said.
I'm not an avant-gardist." "There are some bits [of the opera] that sound very much like Stravinsky and Shostakovich," Mellis adds.
Laird Hunt's latest work is surprisingly accessible, given that he is something of an avant-gardist. But while Neverhome is a more readable narrative than some of his previous novels, it is by no means conventional; it shares the complexity and intensity of character and emotion that critics admire in his more experimental writings.
Instead of disjoining the work from the praxis of life, the avant-gardist purpose is the sublation of art into the praxis of life.