avant-garde

(redirected from avant-gardists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

a·vant-garde

 (ä′vänt-gärd′, ăv′änt-)
n.
A group that creates or promotes innovative ideas or techniques in a given field, especially in the arts.
adj.
Of, relating to, or being part of an innovative group, especially one in the arts: avant-garde painters; an avant-garde theater piece.

[French, from Old French, vanguard; see vanguard.]

a′vant-gard′ism n.
a′vant-gard′ist n.

avant-garde

(ˌævɒŋˈɡɑːd; French avɑ̃ɡard)
n
those artists, writers, musicians, etc, whose techniques and ideas are markedly experimental or in advance of those generally accepted
adj
1. of such artists, etc, their ideas, or techniques
2. radical; daring
[from French: vanguard]
ˌavant-ˈgardism n
ˌavant-ˈgardist n

a•vant-garde

(əˌvɑntˈgɑrd, əˌvænt-, ˌæv ɑnt-, ˌɑ vɑnt-; Fr. a vɑ̃ˈgard)

n.
1. the advance group in a field, esp. in the arts, whose works are unorthodox and experimental.
adj.
2. characteristic of or belonging to the avant-garde.
[1910–15; < French: literally, fore-guard. See vanguard]
a•vant`-gard′ism, n.
a•vant`-gard′ist, n.

avant-garde

A French phrase meaning a vanguard, used to describe artists or ideas that are ahead of their time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.avant-garde - any creative group active in the innovation and application of new concepts and techniques in a given field (especially in the arts)
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Adj.1.avant-garde - radically new or original; "an avant-garde theater piece"
original - being or productive of something fresh and unusual; or being as first made or thought of; "a truly original approach"; "with original music"; "an original mind"

avant-garde

Translations

avant-garde

[ˈævɑːŋˈgɑːd]
A. ADJvanguardista, de vanguardia
B. Nvanguardia f

avant-garde

[ˌævɒŋˈgɑːrd] adjd'avant-garde

avant-garde

nAvantgarde f

avant-garde

[ˈævɒŋˈgɑːd]
1. navanguardia
2. adjd'avanguardia
References in periodicals archive ?
Palomo is far from alone in mining the cross-gender vein at Paris fashion week -- American avant-gardists Thom Browne and Rick Owens are old hands -- and transgender models are now commonplace.
Her titles deploy the vocabulary of music, and the evocation of sound permeates these works--bringing to mind, say, the convergences between jazz and abstraction, the muffling of African American avant-gardists, and the tendency of the establishment to absorb and then gentrify experimental practices.
Even those of us who weren't raised by socially deviant avant-gardists may come away from "The Family Fang" with a renewed appreciation that we are all to some extent at the mercy of those who brought us into the world.
The avant-gardists undertook an assault against such art precisely because they saw it as an institution set off from the praxis of life (86, 83).
Me llamo Nathalie Quintane / Hello my name is Na-tha-lie-quin-ta-ne / naci el 8-3-64 / I was born in 1964 in Paris, France / vivo en Digneles-Bains / I live in the south near the Cote d'Azur / a menudo escribo frases simples / my style is simple, but sometimes complicated / publique mis primeros textos en revistas / I published my poems in avant-gardists, or less avant-gardists, reviews / hago lecturas en voz alta en bibliotecas o salas publicas /I can read on my lips or in my head if you want.
The third essay explores the philosophical and axiological aspects of the artistic presentations of faces in visual and literary artworks by the avant-gardists.
Furthermore, avant-gardists like the painter Magritte and the poet/photographer/collagist/filmmaker Marcel Marien objected to his overt oneiric, symbolist style and lack of political commitment-hence his total absence from the Brussels Surrealist group.
13), a crude but compelling melodrama, significant for featuring the stars of the 1937 Dybbuk; a sampling of the short films made by Polish avant-gardists Franciszka and Stefan Themerson in the 1930s (Jan.
American poets began to take notice in the Seventies: while in the Sixties limited publishing outlets and a general opposition to the Vietnam War gave poets everywhere the sense that they were part of a larger community, even if they stood at disparate edges, by the Seventies the early fissures--Robert Lowell's "Raw and the Cooked" (13) (in which he suggested himself to be a mediation between the two, a notion laughable to the avant-gardists of the day, who saw him as cooked to a crisp) , and Paris Leary and Robert Kelly's A Controversy of Poets (14)--degraded into a free-for-all.
Using Allen Ginsberg and Ron Silliman as his prime examples, he begins by demonstrating how these white avant-gardists self-consciously engaged with and critiqued the centrality of a universalized white subjectivity to poetic meaning.
His reputation, however, was limited to a small circle of avant-gardists until his sensational "second debut" in 1977.
outsourcing of torture is nothing particularly new; throughout the collection, hapless avant-gardists continually rub up against the victims of state-inflicted agonies, hooded, scarred, burned.