ave atque vale

a•ve at•que va•le

(ˈɑ wɛ ˈɑt kwɛ ˈwɑ lɛ; Eng. ˈɑ veɪ ˈɑt kweɪ ˈvɑ leɪ)
Latin.
hail and farewell.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ave atque vale

A Latin phrase meaning hail and farewell.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
Not Mr Wooller, however, who let loose the immortal words, which Tom loved repeating: "Tom, that was the worst 200 I've ever seen!" Ave atque vale, TWG.
Zahlan) were "Ave atque vale: Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe--and Charles Scribner's Sons" by John J.
Catullus the Roman poet must have felt some of the same sentiment when he wrote the words, "Ave Atque Vale," hail and farewell, over the grave of his fallen brother.
There were readings of "Hertha," "Ave Atque Vale," "Thalassius," and several of "A Nympholept" and "The Lake of Gaube," signs that Swinburne's later poetry was now on the map.
Now he's gone and the barn is to be torn down, but I will keep the faith by teaching still more generations of field-trippers in my ecology courses the tune and lyrics of "Rompin' in the Swamp." Ave atque vale, Dave.
(4.) En fait, les deux termes ne se trouvent apparemment ainsi reunis que dans un seul exemple connu des lexicographes latins, dans la formule "Ave Atque Vale", adressee par Catulle a son frere defunt.
In most major metropolitan centres, the kiss has virtually replaced the handshake as the social ave atque vale of our times ...
Swinburne also wrote on William Blake, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Charles Baudelaire, and his elegy on the latter, Ave Atque Vale (published 1868), is among his finest works.
Here he probably wrote the famous ode that ends Frater, ave atque vale ( " Brother, hail and farewell " ).
When Swinburne, in "Ave atque Vale," asks Baudelaire "Shall I strew on thee rose or rue or laurel, / Brother, on this that was the veil of thee?" (ll.
In "Creating from Nothing: Swinburne and Baudelaire in 'Ave Atque Vale.'" (VP 44 [2006]: 251-271), Thomas Brennan revisits Swinburne and Baudelaire's poetic relationship in "Ave Atque Vale" (1868).
Bloom places "Ave Atque Vale" in the latter group (p.