avuncularly

avuncularly

(əˈvʌŋkjʊləlɪ)
adv
in the manner of an uncle
References in periodicals archive ?
Now an elder statesman of music in Wales, and nowadays sporting an avuncularly Verdian beard, the Italian maestro, not generally renowned as a Mahler conductor, drew from his well-trained young charges a reading which was high in adrenaline, breathtakingly accomplished in technique, and movingly committed in terms of emotional content.
When he beamed avuncularly out of the 14-inch screens of 1955 the Radio Times reminded viewers that 'Murder cases are not as frequent as some crime writers would have us imagine'.
Considering the young Christopher's view of Uncle Philip earlier in the novel as an avuncularly witty and eager to please friend of his mother's --preposterously generous to the young boy as well -- we are not altogether unprepared for this unforgivable weakness in his character.
stated but avuncularly implied, is that America's values ought to reflect those of the Walt Disney Company and not the other way around." 4) We must resist the Evil Empire that is Disney.
Garrulity is a feeble word to describe what I encountered in Dail Eireann...." When one of his superiors in the civil service warned him avuncularly about his increasingly frequent recourse to a public house near his office--"You were seen going into the Scotch House"--O'Nolan replied, "You mean I was seen coming into the Scotch House." He died in his mid-fifties from throat cancer brought on by a lifetime of heavy drinking and smoking.