awfy

awfy

(ˈɔːfɪ)
adv
awfully, extremely
References in periodicals archive ?
Andrew McFadyean said: "Whole idea of them doing a Burns Night seems awfy desperate and out of touch wi Scottish folk.
Ah've got an awfy drouth - I seem to be somewhat dehydrated after all that "networking" last night.
Poor wee Jeanie's gettin' awfy thin/ A rickle o' banes covered ower wi' skin/ Noo she's gettin' a wee double chin/ Wi' sookin' Coulter's Candy.
She said: 'I've never heard of them, but they're awfy good
KING'S THEATRE, GLASGOW Record columnist Des Clarke takes on the role of Buttons in this production of Cinderella, which also sees Rab C Nesbitt stars Gregor Fisher and Tony Roper join forces as the awfy ugly sisters.
Gregor Fisher is back again and this time he's joined by Rab C Nesbitt co-star Tony Roper as they take on the roles of the awfy ugly sisters.
Excuses ranged from, "I've twisted it in my sleep" to "it's awfy close", somehow attributing his juddering joint to atmospheric pressure.
The girls behind the counter laugh as he turns and says: "I read your column every week - you're an awfy one
He finished with: "It's guid o ye tae ask me here despite being awfy wealthy - Ah'm sure that ye wid still agree it's better tae be healthy,
He recently got a job as an astronomer's assistant, but the money's rotten and it's awfy boring as he's on constant dayshift.
He leads me and the now blackened fingernail - aka awfy sair digit - and holds it under the cold tap.
He phoned a neighbour and said: "I have done something awfy bad.