awfy

awfy

(ˈɔːfɪ)
adv
awfully, extremely
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"They wished Oor Wee Scottish Legend to be all things Scottish and worked awfy hard at an efter-school club at nicht to make him gey braw!" Now fans of all ages are currently busy "collecting" the various statues they've found via the trail app.
Now when I say football season, I don't mean the snobby fitba' that they play in the Scottish Premiership awash with bevvy and betting sponsorship offering all you can drink corporate hospitality to Billy the Builder who's done "awfy well for himself".
A beach in Thailand micht look awfy braw, but have ye ever tried tae get sand oot o' yer baffies?
Poor wee Jeanie's gettin' awfy thin, A rickle o' banes covered ower wi' skin, Noo she's gettin' a wee double chin, Wi' sookin' Coulter's Candy.
Andrew McFadyean said: "Whole idea of them doing a Burns Night seems awfy desperate and out of touch wi Scottish folk."
But the language has become more anglicised and the density of Scots has lessened with the use of words like 'bonnie' and 'awfy' declining.
Ah've got an awfy drouth - I seem to be somewhat dehydrated after all that "networking" last night.
Fur when ah woke up this mornin''n'couldnae straighten ma knees Ah thought:"Naw, hang on a minute, have ah caught some awfy disease?" An'jist when ah thought it wis o'er, ah wis in fur a hellish surprise; Fur ma knees gave wey below me as ah stood up tae open ma eyes.
"She said: 'I've never heard of them, but they're awfy good!'"
KING'S THEATRE, GLASGOW Record columnist Des Clarke takes on the role of Buttons in this production of Cinderella, which also sees Rab C Nesbitt stars Gregor Fisher and Tony Roper join forces as the awfy ugly sisters.
Poor wee Jeanie's gettin' awfy thin/ A rickle o' banes covered ower wi' skin/ Noo she's gettin' a wee double chin/ Wi' sookin' Coulter's Candy.