axillary

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Related to axillary lymph node: axillary lymph node dissection, Sentinel lymph node

ax·il·lar·y

 (ăk′sə-lĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Anatomy Of, relating to, or located near the axilla.
2. Botany Of, relating to, or located in an axil: axillary bud.
n.
Variant of axillar.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

axillary

(ækˈsɪlərɪ)
adj
1. (Anatomy) of, relating to, or near the armpit
2. (Botany) botany growing in or related to the axil: an axillary bud.
n, pl -laries
(Zoology) (usually plural) Also called: axillar one of the feathers growing from the axilla of a bird's wing
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ax•il•lar•y

(ˈæk səˌlɛr i)

adj., n., pl. -lar•ies. adj.
1. of or pertaining to the axilla.
2. pertaining to an axil.
n.
[1605–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.axillary - of or relating to the axilaxillary - of or relating to the axil    
phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
2.axillary - of or relating to the armpitaxillary - of or relating to the armpit; "axillary gland"
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ax·il·lar·y

a. axilar, rel. a la axila.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

axillary

adj axilar
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been reported that the duration between the onset of the disease and its diagnosis is in the range of 18 weeks to 6 months.3 In the etiology of MBC; family history, hormonal disorders (high levels of estrogen and prolactin), exposure to radiation, liver cirrhosis along with hyperestrogenaemia and Klinefelter syndrome are thought to be effective.4 It has been reported in literature that the tumour size and axillary lymph node involvement are important prognostic factors in male breast cancer as well as in female breast cancer.
"In breast cancer patients, lymphedema is typically seen in women who have undergone an operation called an axillary lymph node dissection, which involves removal of lymph nodes located in the pad of fatty tissue in the underarm, or armpit area."
In 1882, William Halsted introduced the radical mastectomy as the standard treatment for breast cancer and since then, axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) has been adopted as a common surgical technique for nodal assessment (3).
Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was standard of care for a long time and considered necessary for loco regional control as well as for staging purposes.
Later, all patients underwent modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection and the samples of ALNs were sent for histopathology.
The researchers found that 11.2 percent of the participants underwent lumpectomy, 27.5 percent underwent mastectomy, and 61.3 percent underwent lumpectomy or mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection (ALND).
The following features are in favor of regional BCG-related lymphadenitis rather than other pathologies (a) BCG vaccination at the ipsilateral arm, (b) onset between 2 weeks and 6 months, (c) child age not more than 2 years, (d) absence of systemic manifestations such as fever and weight loss, (e) absence of tenderness over the lymph node(s), and (f) axillary lymph node is mostly involved, although supraclavicular or cervical may be involved in isolation or in association with axillary lymphadenopathy.
Granulomatous diseases are known to cause axillary lymph node involvement, and they have been reported in any part of the body as secondary to malignancies (2).
Patients were classified on the basis of Axillary lymph node (ALN) metastasis.
Post diagnosis, the patient underwent left modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection.
Beitsch et al., "Surgical complications associated with sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) plus axillary lymph node dissection compared with SLND alone in the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group trial Z0011," Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol.