axiomatize

axiomatize

(ˌæksɪˈɒməˌtaɪz) or

axiomatise

vb (tr)
to reduce to a system of basic truths or axioms
Translations
axiomatizovat
References in periodicals archive ?
To axiomatize the knowledge pertinent to this example, we describe the graph by a collection of statements of the form connected([N.
Vitalism of this kind, which is supposed to undermine the dominance of capital by positing a form of creative desire that necessarily exists as a surplus external to the capitalist axiomatic, fails to account for the way in which this very notion of excess productivity mirrors the reliance of capital upon the creation of surplus-value: capital actually relies upon a continually increasing productivity in order to produce that surplus for it to capture and axiomatize (Noys, 2011).
In attempting to axiomatize this notion, we are led to the following definition.
Using the above mentioned quantifiers we can axiomatize more mathematical theories and prove uniquely more theorems than we could do using only propositional logic: it can be applied in mathematics also to group theories, algebraic theories, etc.
The main goal of this paper is to axiomatize a metric on the space of partitions of a finite set that is closely related to generalized entropy.
27] that "An axiomatic system is in general constructed in order to axiomatize a certain scientific discipline previously given in a pre-systematic, "naive", or 'genetic' form".
And because the system is axiomatic, we avoid the Kantian problematic that devolves from Eco's refusal to axiomatize.
Actually, most of von Neumann's projects are best understood as responses to Hilbert's program to axiomatize all of mathematics.
We axiomatize prescriptive and conditional expressions.
From the early 1930s through most of the 1980s, the dominant trend in the discipline of economics was to formalize and axiomatize the model of the human agent, minimize its reliance on or reference to assumptions and theories in psychology, and always look first to differences in environmental states (for example, prices and incomes) rather than differences in "tastes.
He indicates, as we have seen, that there are more basic truths in logical reality than are needed to axiomatize logic and arithmetic (B, [sections] 13).