aye-aye

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Related to aye-ayes: Daubentonia madagascariensis

aye-aye

 (ī′ī′)
n.
A nocturnal lemur (Daubentonia madagascariensis) native to the rainforests of eastern and northwestern Madagascar, having prominent ears, a long bushy tail, a thin elongated middle finger, and rodentlike teeth.

[French, from Malagasy aiay.]

aye-aye

(ˈaɪˌaɪ)
n
(Animals) a rare nocturnal arboreal prosimian primate of Madagascar, Daubentonia madagascariensis, related to the lemurs: family Daubentoniidae. It has long bony fingers and rodent-like incisor teeth adapted for feeding on insect larvae and bamboo pith
[C18: from French, from Malagasy aiay, probably of imitative origin]

aye-aye

(ˈaɪˌaɪ)

n.
a nocturnal lemur, Daubentonia madagascariensis, of Madagascar, feeding on insects and fruit and having rodentlike incisors and long fingers.
[1775–85; < French < Malagasy aiay]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aye-aye - nocturnal lemur with long bony fingers and rodent-like incisor teeth closely related to the lemursaye-aye - nocturnal lemur with long bony fingers and rodent-like incisor teeth closely related to the lemurs
lemur - large-eyed arboreal prosimian having foxy faces and long furry tails
Daubentonia, genus Daubentonia - type genus; coextensive with the family Daubentoniidae
References in periodicals archive ?
It's the first time aye-ayes, the world's largest nocturnal primate, have gone on display at the zoo.
While enjoying wallowing in the cuteness of baby Aye-Ayes in Madagascar, there's a serious story about their struggle for survival.
We do not have enough evidence to show if the killing of aye-ayes is happening at a level that endangers the species in general," says Eleanor Sterling, a conservation biologist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.
Misoatra - Malagasy for thank you - is one of only 43 aye-ayes in captivity worldwide.
Aye-ayes are highly specialised hunters with an elongated middle finger on each hand, which they use for catching prey.
Comedian John Cleese once described the aye-ayes as having hands like "Swiss army knives".
Like other primates, aye-ayes have fingernails, front-facing eyes, and large brains.
Many villagers in Madagascar think aye-ayes can put curses on them," says Carl Erickson, a Duke experimental psychologist.
Duke has maintained a colony of aye-ayes since 1988 as part of an international attempt to save the sinister-looking animals from extinction (SN: 3/19/88, p.
14), try out this activity to learn how sound waves help aye-ayes locate food.
Aye-Ayes use their long middle finger for digging out larvae in trees to eat.
The two males at Duke, along with two females and one young male at the French National Zoo in Vincennes, are the only aye-ayes in captivity -- and the only ones allowed to leave Madagascar since 1930.