aye-aye

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Related to aye-ayes: Daubentonia madagascariensis

aye-aye

 (ī′ī′)
n.
A nocturnal lemur (Daubentonia madagascariensis) native to the rainforests of eastern and northwestern Madagascar, having prominent ears, a long bushy tail, a thin elongated middle finger, and rodentlike teeth.

[French, from Malagasy aiay.]

aye-aye

(ˈaɪˌaɪ)
n
(Animals) a rare nocturnal arboreal prosimian primate of Madagascar, Daubentonia madagascariensis, related to the lemurs: family Daubentoniidae. It has long bony fingers and rodent-like incisor teeth adapted for feeding on insect larvae and bamboo pith
[C18: from French, from Malagasy aiay, probably of imitative origin]

aye-aye

(ˈaɪˌaɪ)

n.
a nocturnal lemur, Daubentonia madagascariensis, of Madagascar, feeding on insects and fruit and having rodentlike incisors and long fingers.
[1775–85; < French < Malagasy aiay]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aye-aye - nocturnal lemur with long bony fingers and rodent-like incisor teeth closely related to the lemursaye-aye - nocturnal lemur with long bony fingers and rodent-like incisor teeth closely related to the lemurs
lemur - large-eyed arboreal prosimian having foxy faces and long furry tails
Daubentonia, genus Daubentonia - type genus; coextensive with the family Daubentoniidae
References in periodicals archive ?
He also noted that the stump of a broken front tooth would have jutted out from its mouth like a dagger ndash a trait only known in aye-ayes, the only living primates with rodent-like teeth.
It's the first time aye-ayes, the world's largest nocturnal primate, have gone on display at the zoo.
While enjoying wallowing in the cuteness of baby Aye-Ayes in Madagascar, there's a serious story about their struggle for survival.
"We do not have enough evidence to show if the killing of aye-ayes is happening at a level that endangers the species in general," says Eleanor Sterling, a conservation biologist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.
Misoatra - Malagasy for thank you - is one of only 43 aye-ayes in captivity worldwide.
Aye-ayes are highly specialised hunters with an elongated middle finger on each hand, which they use for catching prey.
Comedian John Cleese once described the aye-ayes as having hands like "Swiss army knives".
Aye-ayes live only in the forests of Madagascar, an island nation off the southeast coast of Africa.
Erickson's fascination with aye-ayes began when the first aye-aye arrived at Duke in the late 1980s.
Duke has maintained a colony of aye-ayes since 1988 as part of an international attempt to save the sinister-looking animals from extinction (SN: 3/19/88, p.
14), try out this activity to learn how sound waves help aye-ayes locate food.
Aye-Ayes use their long middle finger for digging out larvae in trees to eat.