azimuth resolution


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azimuth resolution

The ability of radar equipment to separate two reflectors at similar ranges but different bearings from a reference point. Normally the minimum separation distance between the reflectors is quoted and expressed as the angle subtended by the reflectors at the reference point.
References in periodicals archive ?
In different working modes, the azimuth resolution ability is listed in the order TOPS < sliding spotlight < spotlight, whereas the surface coverage is listed in the reverse order.
Firstly, if we want high azimuth resolution, the azimuth synthetic aperture is also very long, which will cause huge sampling number.
While in flight direction multiple phase centre beam forming processing is used to enhance the azimuth resolution in elevation DBF is utilised to recover signal energy in order to improve the SNR for a given transmit power.
In principle, by combining with SAR techniques, current commercial short range radar products can achieve very high azimuth resolution, and therefore additional applications are expected.
Here, as in single-look SARs, the high range resolution is commonly achieved by using a linear frequency modulation (LFM) of the transmitted radar pulses, whereas the high azimuth resolution is obtained by a coherent processing of the consequent backscattered radar pulses.
The azimuth resolution [[rho].sub.a] can be expressed as Equation (3) [4].
For these systems operating at low frequencies, e.g., the VHF/UHF band, or at higher frequencies (usually more than 1 GHz) with super high azimuth resolution (0.5m or higher), motion compensation (MoCo) is quite a challenge.
SAR measurements use relatively simple antennas with a small aperture length and, therefore, poor azimuth resolution. By translating the sensor as shown in Figure 5 appropriately and coherently combining received signals from the different azimuth positions, the equivalent physical length of the aperture can be increased.
However, the image formed by conventional radar (so-called real aperture radar, RAR) was poor in azimuth resolution.
Although True Flight isn't slicing the loaf that thin, its display, as shown here, will split the XRX's quadrants, dividing the azimuth resolution into eight segments.
The azimuth resolution available from such a beam is dependant on range, increasing with distance.
Narrow beam widths are required for added azimuth resolution. But shorter pulses result in less average power and narrow beams demand higher frequencies or larger antennas.