baby bond


Also found in: Financial.

baby bond

n.
A bond issued in an amount less than $1,000.

baby bond

n
(Banking & Finance) Brit a sum of money invested shortly after the birth of a child, the returns of which may not be collected until the child reaches adulthood
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2001 The Government announced plans to give every baby PS500 in a baby bond. 2005 Under international pressure, Syria withdrew the last of its 14,000-troop military garrison in Lebanon, ending its 29-year military domination.
A spokesman for Chessington said: "This is early days and a sensitive time as mother and baby bond, however they are both currently doing well and we wanted to ensure you, our adventurers, were first to know."
Photo courtesy of WHO CAIRO -- 16 April 2018: Breastfeeding is an amazing and emotional experience for both the mother and the baby due to physical closeness and eye contact that helps the baby bond with its mother and feel secure.
There's a proposal to give every newborn in the United States a "Baby Bond" account with somewhere between $500 to $50,000 in cash.
Webcams help baby bond WEBCAMS can help improve early bonding between parents and premature babies, a study has found.
government should create, along with a Social Security number, a savings account for that child into which between $5,000 and $7,500 is placed--called a baby bond or, as some prefer to call it, a service bond.
Positive touch offered by the parents has been shown to be more beneficial for the well being of these fragile babies and importantly supports the development of a strong parent/ baby bond, which is the foundation of attachment parenting--the philosophy of the IAIM.
Welsh councils will have to top up 'baby bond' accounts for children in care, under a plan backed by AMs.
nYOUR choices include a savings account or a National Savings baby bond. A unit trust could be started in the children's names or you can take out a friendly society policy.
Tunbridge Wells Equitable's Baby Bond (0500 110011) is one of the most popular on the market.
(1) A bond received as payment of interest is known as a "baby bond" or a "pay-in-kind" (PIK) bond.
That is to say that the "devolution dividend" resulting from Welsh government policies means that families living in Wales enjoy benefits envied by their English counterparts: free prescriptions; cheaper council tax; free and healthy school breakfasts; a top-up to the UK baby bond; school uniform grants; free bus travel for pensioners and reduced travel costs for post-16 students; grants for HE students in Wales offsetting the top-up fees typically charged by English universities; grants for the over-80s to install central heating in their homes, free swimming for older people and, on weekends and holidays, for schoolchildren.