baby buster


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baby buster

n.
A person born during a baby bust.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baby buster - a person born in the generation following the baby boom when the birth rate fell dramatically
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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You probably are aware of the increasing influence of the "senior" generation; the power of the "baby boomer" and that generation's aging; and the new generation entering the work force: the "baby buster."
Yet, when the crunch of Baby Boomers retire in the next 15 to 20 years, there won't be enough "Baby Buster" workers to support them with current Social Security taxes.
Results of a study by international research firm Kantar Millward Brown called 'AdReaction: Engaging Gen X, Y and Z' recently revealed that compared to baby busters (Gen X) and millennials (Gen Y), the centennials-those born between 1997-2011-are a 'particularly tricky' audience to engage, 'because they are highly discriminating and more averse to advertising in general' compared to the two older generations.
First, birthrates declined just as Generation X began (hence the moniker "baby busters").
Employers may need all the help they can get with finding, and keeping, the graying baby busters, and precocious millennials, who have somehow worked steadily enough, and in responsible enough positions, to equip themselves for proper jobs in areas other than coffee preparation.
Gen X-born between 1961 and 1981-is also known as baby busters, slackers and latchkey kids.
The PwC report predicts the baby busters won't be in a position to buy their own home until their mid-30s, Kim's first house, which she bought aged 22, cost somewhere in the region of pounds 27,000.
The various generations: Baby Boomers, Baby Busters, Generation X & Y all have differing and competing interests, needs and expectations that are placing a demand on organizations to embrace, cultivate and incorporate these needs within the organizational structure.
At ages 30-34 and 35-39 (currently the peak ages for having children) the respective decline and increase in numbers of women is explained by the baby busters moving out of the former group and into the latter, while at 40-44 and 45-49 years the similar, but more pronounced, shift is caused by the ageing of the lagging edge boomers.
The extensive media coverage and public discussions about women's rights during the 1960s and 1970s waned considerably by the time baby busters reached political adolescence.
This group has also been referred to as the Baby Busters, Twenty-somethings, YIFFIES (young individualistic freedom-minded few), the Brash Pack, FLYERS (fun-loving youth en route to success), the NIKES (no-income kids with education), the indifferent generation, and the invisible generation (16).
This is especially true when dealing with Baby Busters who have a lifetime immunity against organizational loyalty.