baby-boomer


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

baby-boomer

n
(Sociology) a person born during a baby boom, esp (in Britain and the US) one born during the years 1945–55
References in periodicals archive ?
On top of this, baby-boomer bank customers are among the least satisfied of any generation with the banking industry overall; nearly one in four in this generation are dissatisfied, with 9% not satisfied at all and another 14% dissatisfied.
"The baby-boomer generation is characterized by their desire for independence," notes Jeffrey Anshel, who is an optometrist and president of the Ocular Nutrition Society.
* Do homework--e.g., study and research current baby-boomer trends.
A study by Mintel found that the baby-boomer generation now has more spending power than any other age group u they get through pounds 78 more a week than other age groups u and, no longer tied down by families, are taking time out to travel.
The basic concept of the new party, to be called the ''Dankai (baby-boomer) Party,'' is the creation of places for boomers to rebuild human relations in cities where such relations have become limited and so that they can enjoy life in the 20-30 years after retirement.
This growing baby-boomer market segment represents challenges for both financial advisors and financial institutions.
With the exception of the academy, baby-boomer movement prestige is not transferable to other arenas of American life.
Lincoln Financial, however, sees opportunity in the mushrooming of retirement savings that will come from the baby-boomer market in the near future.
It's as though Nirvana took a run at the wall of baby-boomer culture and were broken on it; now the group's peers hang back fearfully, un/happy to reproduce the rock values they wanted to replace.
In the end, I am left wondering, among other things, to what extent it was TV (and movies and songs and ads) that helped light the radical fire under baby-boomer teens and to what extent it was talking about TV that did the trick.
Early retirement by baby-boomers would reduce the long-term burden on the social security trust fund.
These baby-boomers will reach Japan's typical retirement age of sixty years old starting in two years.